Frequently Asked Questions-Complainants

What should I do immediately after experiencing sexual assault? 
1. Get to a safe location. Dial 911 or Campus Safety at 303.458.4122 to assist with safety and medical concerns.
2. Contact someone you trust for support. Be aware that some staff members, faculty, and your RA will need to report some information you share with them. If you would like confidential and privileged support, please contact:
a. Violence Prevention Program Coordinator 303.458.4029
b. Office of Counseling and Personal Development: 303.458.3507 
c. University Ministry: 303.458.4153
d. Blue Bench 24-Hour Hotline: 303.322.7273
3. Consider seeking medical attention. It is best to seek out a hospital or emergency room with a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) program.
4. At SANE program locations, you have the option to receive a medical forensic examination, even if you do not want to report the incident to law enforcement at the time. Any collected evidence will be preserved for at least two years, in case you decide to report to the police at a later date. See a list of Hospitals that provide SANE examinations in Appendix E, Resources.
5. Regardless of your choice to receive a medical forensic exam, it is important to seek medical attention in order to treat injuries and exposure to Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs).Testing for possible drugs used to facilitate a sexual assault may also be available.

Additional information about medical forensic exams

What happens if I was under the influence or alcohol or drugs when the incident occurred?
As explained in this Policy, an individual who is incapacitated because of the use of drugs or alcohol cannot consent to sexual activity. The use of drugs and alcohol will be considered during the investigation for the purpose of analyzing whether or not sexual activity was consensual. As explained in this Policy, Regis University pursues a policy of offering reporting parties and witnesses amnesty from minor policy violations related to the incident to encourage good faith reporting.

On the other hand, alcohol and/or drug use is likely to affect the complainant’s memory and, therefore, may affect the outcome of the complaint. If the complainant does not remember the circumstances of the alleged incident and cannot provide sufficient circumstantial evidence, physical evidence and/or witnesses to prove his/her complaint it may not be possible to impose sanctions on the accused without further corroborating information.

What happens if the respondent was under the influence of alcohol or drugs?

The use of alcohol and/or drugs by either party will not diminish an individual’s responsibility for abstaining from violent behavior or their responsibility to obtain affirmative consent for sexual activity. For instance, an individual’s responsibility is not diminished if they were severely intoxicated, drove drunk and caused harm to another driver.

Will my parents or family members be told?
No, not unless you tell them, however, university officials may disclose information if a life threatening health or safety concern exists. Whether you are the complainant or the respondent, the University’s primary relationship is to the student and not to the parent. However, in the event of major medical, disciplinary, or academic jeopardy, students are strongly encouraged to inform their parents. University officials may also directly inform parents when requested to do so by a student. A student must make this request to the EO & Title IX Coordinator and sign appropriate consent forms to allow such communication. 

Will the accused individual know my identity?

Yes, if you request the incident be investigated or action be taken against the respondent. Sexual misconduct is a serious allegation and the accused individual has the right to know the identity of the complainant and the opportunity to respond. No, if you choose to respond informally or request only interim measures such as housing assistance or arranging your class schedule (but you should consult the confidentiality sections in this policy to better understand the University’s legal obligations depending on what information you share with different University officials).

Do I have to name the perpetrator?

Yes, if you want formal disciplinary action to be taken against the respondent. No, if you choose to respond informally and do not file a formal complaint (but you should consult the confidentiality sections in this policy to better understand the University’s legal obligations depending on what information you share with different University officials). Complainants should be aware that not identifying the respondent may limit the institution’s ability to respond comprehensively.  

What should I do if I witness or know about sexual harassment, violence or misconduct of another person? 

Witnessing sexual harassment, sexual violence or misconducts can be a very difficult experience and your response to it may be critical to the outcome of the situation. The first priority is to make sure that you and the complainant are safe. If needed, call 911 to get police assistance or call University Campus Safety at 303.458.4122. Listen carefully and compassionately to the complainant, don’t touch them without their consent, and avoid making any judgmental comments. Make sure that the complainant has complete information about all the resources available and help complainants to understand their choices related to getting medical assistance, emotional support and reporting the incident. If you can, offer your help in getting the complainant to support resources. Write down detailed information about the allegation such as place, time, names of everybody involved, witnesses and what has happened. You may need it later. Remember not to assure confidentiality to the complainant, you may need to report it later. If you are unsure of what you should do, please contact the Violence Prevention Coordinator.


Preserving Evidence: Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence and Stalking

How can I best preserve any evidence of sexual assault?
Preserving evidence, such as clothing, sheets, text messages, or other contact is helpful if you are considering an investigation or criminal case. Though your first thought may be to dispose of these items or to shower, hold onto the evidence and wait to shower until after the SANE/SAFE exam. Most importantly, even if you decide to shower or dispose of evidence, you still have the option to report to the police and evidence may still be collected. In addition:

• Go as soon as possible, preferably within the next 72 hours to the nearest local hospital with an appropriate Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program (SANE). You have the option to complete a medical forensic exam to collect evidence, evaluate and treat injuries and/or receive preventative care for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs).  
• The University has signed an agreement with a local transportation service and will give you a voucher that you can use to get to the hospital and to come back to campus, if appropriate. Campus Safety will be able to assist you.
• If you have changed your clothes since the assault, bring the clothing you had at the time of the assault to the hospital in a paper grocery bag or wrap them in a clean sheet (do not use plastic bags). The Hospital will request to collect the clothes you were wearing as evidence.
• If you want to preserve the evidence of a sexual assault try not to: 
• Bathe or shower 
• Brush your teeth  
• Use the restroom
• Change clothes
• Comb hair
• Clean up the area where the assault occurred
• Move anything the respondent may have touched. You may also consider preserving text messages and/or other electronic communications with the respondent. They may serve as evidence in your case. 
• Even if you choose do these things (like shower) evidence may still be collected and you are encouraged to seek assistance accordingly.

How can I best preserve any evidence of relationship violence and stalking? 

Properly documenting all incidents is important to illustrate a pattern of behavior necessary for an investigation or for obtaining a Civil Protection Order. A victim advocate or advisor may assist you with gathering all relevant information. You may consider:
1. Keeping an incident or behavior log to document stalking or relationship violence. An example of a log can be found at victimsofcrime.org.
2. Contacting witnesses who saw the stalking behavior, abuse, or your injuries. These individuals may testify in your hearing. 
3. Preserve evidence and documentation of stalking or abuse, including:

  • Text messages, emails, social media content and other screenshots;
  • Copies of police reports or medical reports;
  • Photographs of injuries, damage to objects or other items within your residence;
  • Threatening voicemails or other audio/video; and
  • Anything else that might help the judge make a decision.

Frequently Asked Questions-Respondents

There are resources available to you to assist individuals accused of discrimination or sexual misconduct during the EO & Title IX process. An advisor or confidential resource can also help you navigate your options.

What do I do if I am accused of discrimination or sexual misconduct?
It is important that you do not contact the complainant.

In cases of sexual misconduct, you may immediately want to contact someone who can act as your advisor. Anyone may serve as your advisor or you may choose to select a university staff person trained as an advisor, which are listed in the Resources for Respondents section. 

As outlined through this policy, individuals accused of discrimination or sexual misconduct have rights under this Policy. Read the University Policy carefully and get informed about your rights. The EO & Title IX Coordinator is also available to explain the University’s procedures for addressing discrimination and sexual misconduct complaints and to answer any questions you may have. 

Interim measures, depending on the circumstances, may be available to you during the course of an investigation. You are also encouraged to notify the EO & Title IX Coordinator of any concerns that arise as a result of the investigation, such as with your class schedule, university activities, coursework or housing arrangements. 

If you feel you have been harassed as the result of these allegations, please promptly report these incidents to the EO & Title IX Coordinator.

It is important that you save any information you believe is relevant to disputing the allegations, such as text messages or social media messages. You will also have the opportunity to respond to the allegations, which may include presenting relevant information and requesting that the investigator speak with witnesses. 

Emotional and confidential support is available to you on campus and in the community. See the Resources tab for more information. 

Will my parents or family members be told?
No, not unless you tell them, however, university officials may disclose information if a life threatening health or safety concern exists. Whether you are the complainant or the respondent, the University’s primary relationship is to the student and not to the parent. However, in the event of major medical, disciplinary, or academic jeopardy, students are strongly encouraged to inform their parents. University officials may also directly inform parents when requested to do so by a student. A student must make this request to the EO & Title IX Coordinator and sign appropriate consent forms to allow such communication. 

What happens if I was under the influence of alcohol or drugs?
The use of alcohol and/or drugs by either party will not diminish an individual’s responsibility for abstaining from violent behavior or their responsibility to obtain affirmative consent for sexual activity. For instance, an individual’s responsibility is not diminished if they caused harm to another driver after driving while intoxicated. 

Emotional Support and Counseling: We highly recommend that you seek support. The University provides multiple options for support including counseling through The Office of Counseling and Personal Development and University Ministry. University personnel on campus have different reporting responsibilities and different abilities to maintain confidentiality, depending on their roles. An employee’s duty to report may vary based on the law, the situation and the employee’s role.


What shall I do if I witness or know about sexual harassment, violence or misconduct of another person?

Witnessing sexual harassment, sexual violence or misconducts can be a very difficult experience and your response to it may be critical to the outcome of the situation. The first priority is to make sure that you and the complainant are safe. If needed, call 911 to get police assistance or call University Campus Safety at 303.458.4122. Listen carefully and compassionately to the complainant, don’t touch them without their consent, and avoid making any judgmental comments. Make sure that the complainant has complete information about all the resources available and help complainants to understand their choices related to getting medical assistance, emotional support and reporting the incident. If you can, offer your help in getting the complainant to support resources. Write down detailed information about the allegation such as place, time, names of everybody involved, witnesses and what has happened. You may need it later. Remember not to assure confidentiality to the complainant, you may need to report it later. If you are unsure of what you should do, please contact the Violence Prevention Coordinator.


Sexual Assault Medical Forensic Exams

Medical care and evidence collection following a sexual assault are available and do not require participation in a law enforcement or university investigation. Medical care and evidence collection should be sought as soon as possible, generally within 7 days after the incident. Individuals in the Denver Metro area seeking medical care following a sexual assault are encouraged to go to:

Denver Health Medical Center Emergency Department

7777 Bannock St. Denver, CO 80204
Located in the Main Entrance, Pavilion A
303.436.6000

Sexual assault medical care is available at Denver Health 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. No appointment is necessary. 

The Violence Prevention Program Coordinator or advocates on The Blue Bench 24/7 hotline are available to discuss medical options. They can also help identify an alternative hospital with Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) if Denver Health is not a convenient option. 

Transportation Options

Regis University staff on the Northwest Denver campus are available to assist you with identifying and providing transportation options for medical care related to a sexual assault. Taxi vouchers and help with transportation can be provided through the following departments: 

Student Health Services : 303.458.3558 (during business hours)
Violence Prevention Program Coordinator 303.458.4029 (during business hours)
Department of Campus Safety 303.458.4122 (available 24/7)
The on-call Residence Life Coordinator (accessible to residents through any Resident Assistant).

Public transportation from the Northwest Denver Campus to Denver Health Medical Center is available by way of RTD Bus 52, with stops within a short walking distance of both locations. 

For more information about public transportation options, please visit the RTD Website