Studying History at Regis

The history program at Regis helps students develop the ability to read critically, think logically, and write effectively. Students acquire the skills, knowledge, and understandings that prepare them for variety of careers and for lives as citizen leaders in diverse societies.
Classroom

B.A. in History

Degree Overview

The abilities to describe, understand, and communicate effectively are skills in demand not only by graduate and professional schools but also by employers in business, industry, and government. The study of history develops your ability to read critically, think logically, and write effectively. In addition, by studying human interaction in the past we gain insight into the present and the future. Understanding history helps us to better evaluate current problems at home and abroad and to develop solutions to those challenges.

Program Requirements

Listed below are the required courses for completion of this degree at Regis University. Please note that recent course requirement updates may not be reflected in the list below and you should contact the Office of Enrollment Services at 303.458.4126 for recent changes and updates.

This degree program requires 128.00 credit hours for completion. Please contact your advisor or the Office of Enrollment Services at 303.458.4126.

Regis College: Core Requirements

Economics

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3-6 SH)
Take 1 of the following groups:
Group 1: EC 200 - Intro to the American Economy
Group 2: EC 320 - Principles of Macroeconomics
and
EC 330 - Principles of Microeconomics

EN 250 - Literature Matters

Introduces the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama, with an emphasis on works that have had a profound influence on our world. Students will write a series of analytical essays, including at least one research essay.

Pre-requisite: TAKE RCC*200

Fine Arts

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(3SH)
Take three (3) semester hours of Fine Arts
from the following courses:
any 200-level FAC course, FAHS 211, FAHS 212

Foreign Language

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(6-8SH)
Take two classes in one language

Foundational

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(6 SH)
Take 1 of the following groups:
Group 1: RCC 200 - Writing Analytically (Fall)
Communicative Intensive (Spring)
Group 2: Commitment Program Students
RCC 200A - Writing Analytically A (Fall)
RCC 200B - Writing Analytically B (Spring)
Group 3: Honors Program Students
RCC 200H - Honors Writing Seminar (Fall)
RCC 300H - Honors Trad & Innovation (Spring)

History

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3SH)
Three (3) credits from any 200-level History course

Integrative

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(12SH)
Take all of the following courses:
RCC 400D (Group 1), RCC 410E (Group 2),
RCC 420J (Group 3), RCC 430M (Group 4)

Mathematics

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(3-4SH)
Take one of the following Mathematics course:
MT 201, MT 204, MT 270, MT 270C, MT 272, MT 272C
MT 360A, MT 360B

Natural Science

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(4SH)
Take one Natural Science course (Group 1) with the
accompanying lab (Group 2).
Eligible courses include:
BL( 204/5E-W, 208/9, 216/17, 260/1, 262/3), ENVS 250/1,
GE 208/9, PH (202A, 205A, 304A, 305A),
AS 250/1 (Non-Science majors),
NS 260/1 (cannot be counted for Psychology Majors)

Philosophy

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(3SH)
Take one of the following Philosophy courses:
PL 270, PL 270C, PL 270H, PL 270P

Public Speaking

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3SH)
Speech Communication

Religious Studies

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3SH)
Any 300 level RT course

RT 201 - Religion and the Human Quest

Considering human existence in relation to the sacred and drawing on Eastern and Western religious traditions, this course explores religious perspectives on human questions about life, suffering, goodness, and ultimacy.

Cross listing(s): RT 201C.

Social Science

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(3SH)
Take three (3) semester hours from the following course list
ED 204, POL 215, POL 231, POL 241, PY 250, PY 250C, PY 250H,
SO 200, SO 200C, SO 203, AN/SO 204, PJ 200

RC: History Major

HS 495J - Reading Seminar in History

One of two seminars in historiography required of all History majors, the Reading Seminar focuses on critical analysis of selected themes in historical writing. The Reading Seminar is team-taught by members of the History faculty.

HS 495K - Research Seminar in History

One of two seminars in historiography required of all History majors, students in the Research Seminar engage in the process of researching, writing, and presenting a major seminar paper. The Research Seminar is supervised by the History faculty.

HS 498E-W - Internship/History

Provides practical experience in applied history. Students are placed according to their interest at national archives, museums, historical societies, public interest groups, nonprofit organizations, international businesses, at the local, regional, national or international level. Includes research work in history with the Department's faculty.

Lower Division

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(12SH)
Take twelve (12) lower division semester hours of
History (HS) courses with at least three (3) fields
(Asia, Europe, Middle East, United States, World)
and two (2) time periods covered (before 1600 and
after 1600). One, three semester hour course
constitutes minimum representation.

Upper Division

The course descriptions for the above mentioned class could not be found. Please contact Academic Records & Registration at 303-458-4126 with questions. Some additional course information is available and shown here.

(18SH)
Take eighteen (18) upper division semester hours of
History (HS) courses with at least two (2) fields
(Asia, Europe, Middle East, United States) represented.
One, three semester hour course constitutes
minimum representation.

Course Descriptions

Listed below are the available courses offered at Regis University within this respective degree program. The courses below include the degree program requirements as well as subject related courses. Please contact the Office of Enrollment Services at 303.458.4126 for recent changes and updates.

HS 200 Sustainability & Collapse in World Hist (3.00)

Takes an evidence-based, case study, theoretical and integrative approach to the challenge of sustainability across world history. Draws on disciplines of history, politics, and international studies.

Cross listing(s): POL 200.

HS 201 Origins & Challenges of the Modern Wrld (3.00)

Takes an evidence-based case study, theoretical and integrative approach to underlying origins and present challenges of the modern world. Draws on disciplines of history, politics, and international studies.

Cross listing(s): POL 201.

HS 203 World History I: Ecological Perspective (3.00)

Surveys human history from the origins of humankind to the present. Focuses on global ecology, environment, geography, and the subsequent development of technology and culture.

HS 213 Survey of Western Civ to 1600 (3.00)

Studies the evolution of western civilization from the beginnings of civilization through the period of the Reformation. Emphasizes concepts and institutions that have played major roles in the evolution of western civilization. Includes major themes on the formation of the great religions which have influenced the West, Classical culture, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Reformation.

HS 214 Survey Western Civ Since 1600 (3.00)

Traces the evolution of modern western civilization, and those events and institutions that have had a decisive influence on modern Western culture. Includes major themes on absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the great wars of the 20th century and the ideologies of the modern world.

HS 223 History of U.S. to 1877 (3.00)

Surveys the development of United States civilization from the era of discovery, exploration and settlement to the end of the Reconstruction.

HS 224 History of U.S. Since 1865 (3.00)

Studies the evolution of modern industrial United States from the end of the Civil War to the present.

HS 226 History of the American West (3.00)

Surveys the major political, social, environmental, and cultural changes of the trans-Mississippi American West, from pre-Columbian times to the late 20th Century.

HS 238 Greater Middle E. 600-1850 (3.00)

An introduction that focuses on the environmental resource base, regional and cultural identities, and social, economic, and political organization from the origins of Islam to the imposition of unequal treaties by European powers.

HS 239 Greater Middle East 1750-Present (3.00)

An introduction that focuses on the impact of world trade and European imperialism on society and culture from North Africa to Pakistan, as well as on local efforts to regain control over environment and resources.

HS 250 Survey of Africa to 1800 (3.00)

Surveys African history up to the 19th century. Explores ancient kingdoms, the spread of Islam, the trans-Saharan and Indian Ocean trades, West African state formation, the Atlantic slave trade, and slavery within Africa.

HS 251 Survey of Africa Since 1800 (3.00)

Surveys African history through the 19th and 20th Centuries to the present. Explores the spread of Islam, colonization, competition for resources in "archipelago states", modern state formation and regionalism, slavery and apartheid, and responses to globalization and transnational forces.

HS 253 Survey Asian Hist to 16th Cent (3.00)

Surveys the history of East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea) from earliest times to the arrival of Western imperialism.

HS 254 Survey Asian Hist Since 1850 (3.00)

Provides an overview of East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea) during modern times, emphasizing cultural developments, modern institutions, increased trade, industrialization, imperialistic intrusions, destructive warfare and burgeoning population.

HS 260 Survey of Latin America to 1826 (3.00)

Draws on primary and secondary materials to survey and interpret cultural, political, and historical developments up to the colonial period of the early 19th century.

HS 261 Survey Latin America Since 1826 (3.00)

Draws on primary and secondary materials to survey and interpret cultural, political, and historical developments from the colonial period and revolutionary movements, to 20th Century strong states and Dirty Wars, and the effect of North American and globalist forces.

HS 403 World History to 1600: Ecological PrspctýWorld History: An Ecological Perspct (3.00)

Focuses on the ecological, cultural and civilizational regions of the world and their interactions from pre-history to 1600. Employs case studies and historical methodology.

Cross listing(s): ENVS 433.

HS 404 World Hist Since 1400: Ecological Prspct (3.00)

Focuses on the ecological cultural and civilizational regions of the world and the increasing ecological costs of interdependence. Employs case studies and historical methodology.

Cross listing(s): PJ 434 ENVS 444.

HS 405 Sustainable Agriculture (3.00)

Focuses on the national and international effects of agribusiness and food policies on the environment, labor and health.

Cross listing(s): ENVS 405 PJ 435.

HS 406 History of the American Southwest (3.00)

Provides an overview of the regions social, cultural, and political history. Explores Southwestern history from the eve of the Spanish explorations through the Spanish and Mexican periods, and through the American occupation of the region-1848 to the present.

HS 407 History/Practices of Schoolyrd Greening (3.00)

Investigates historical, ecological, cultural, and agricultural statuses of two schoolyards to address environmental issues. Participants conduct interdisciplinary projects and presentations with children and youth. Service-learning required in Denver; optional weekend service-learning in southern Colorado.

Cross listing(s): ENVS 407.

HS 410 The Renaissance in Europe (3.00)

This interdisciplinary course examines significant political, military, social, religious, and cultural developments in Europe during the Renaissance, from the Black Death of the 14th Century through the end of the Wars of Religion in 1650.

HS 411 Four Figures of the Renaissance (3.00)

A problem-based and integrative approach to the European Renaissance, asking why and how four achievements came into being in particular times and places, drawing on Raphael, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, and Descartes.

HS 412 Immigration in American History (3.00)

Examines the history of immigration into the United States from the early 19th century to the present. Explores federal policies, public debates surrounding the issue of immigration, and the social, economic, political consequences of immigration and the historical experiences of immigrants.

Cross listing(s): PJ 412.

HS 415 Readings in Native American History (3.00)

Surveys a variety of texts as they examine some of the major themes and experiences that have defined and shaped the history of Native American peoples, from Pre-Columbian times to the present.

HS 416 Labor in the Americas (3.00)

Examines the history of labor and the working class in the United States with particular attention to the transnational nature of labor and laborers across national borders.

Cross listing(s): PJ 476.

HS 426 Age of Enterprise 1865-1917 (3.00)

Studies the United States from the end of the Civil War to World War I, emphasizing transportation, industrial expansion, the rise of organized labor, populism and progressivism and the growth of American power.

HS 427 20th Century US 1917-45 (3.00)

Studies the history of the United States from intervention in World War I to the end of World World War II, emphasizing the Depression and the New Deal.

HS 428 U.S. History 1945 to Present (3.00)

Studies recent events and trends in the United States since the end of World War II.

HS 429 U.S. in the 1960s & 1970s (3.00)

Studies the US from the election of JFK to the Reagan Revolution, examining Politics, Culture, and Society.

HS 430 History of Colorado (3.00)

Surveys Indian, Spanish, French and United States influences; the impact of traders, trappers, miners, cattlemen and farmers; the creation and organization of the Territory; the movement for statehood and the problems of a rapidly growing commonwealth.

HS 437 The W in United States History (3.00)

Includes an inquiry into the influence of the West in United States History, the settlement of the western regions, problems of frontier transportation and finance, and the organization of new government entities.

HS 451 History of Premodern Japan (3.00)

Traces themes from earliest times into the Tokugawa period. Examines Shintoism, Buddhism, Chinese influences, the Japanese genius for adaptation, the rise of the samurai class, cultural advances and institutional and social developments that grounded the modern transformation. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of instructor.

HS 452 History of Modern Japan (3.00)

Studies Japan's attempts, beginning in the mid-19th century, to face the Western challenge, internal reforms, the Meiji restoration of the emperor, the astounding efforts of modernization, involvement with imperialism and war, adventures in China, the struggle at home between the forces of militarism and democracy, the Pacific war and occupation and the economic miracle. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of instructor.

HS 453 History of Imperial China (3.00)

Studies the dynastic cycles, Confucianism and Taoism, in their historical settings; the "barbarian" threat, the Golden Ages of Chinese culture; the tributary system; the early European arrivals; the Rites controversy; and Western fascination fro Chinese ways. Concludes with the Qing dynasty in the early 1800's.

HS 454 History of Modern China (3.00)

Examines the institutions and developments of the late 19th and 20th centuries. Includes the Self-Strengthening Movement, Western imperialism, the transformation of the gentry and peasant classes, the use of revolutions, the rise of the Communist and Nationalist parties, the Maoist cult, the Cultural Revolution and subsequent developments.

HS 455 Stories From Wartime (3.00)

Encourages students to critically examine modern conflict and explore the variety of ways those affected by conflict have sought to find meaning in their experience

HS 457 Pac War:Road to Pearl Harbor/Nagasaki (3.00)

Sorts out and evaluates the many interpretations of the war. Relying on books and/or films, traces the struggle between Japan and the United States, emphasizing Japan. Examines imperialistic military adventurism versus liberal democracy. Studies Japanese and American goals and diplomacy over issues in the western Pacific, the domestic implications for Japan and the impact of the war on Japanese society. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor.

HS 464 19th Century Europe 1789-1914 (3.00)

Studies the great age of European dynamism emphasizing political and economic events. Includes the French Revolution, industrialization, the rise of the working class, Marxism, unification of Italy and Germany, nationalism, the New Imperialism and the origins of World War I.

HS 465 Europe Since 1914 - 1945 (3.00)

Studies the transformation of Europe from World War I emphasizing military, economic, political, and ideological developments. Includes World War I, Versailles, the rise of totalitarianism, World War II, the collapse of the European empires and the loss of European preeminence.

HS 468 History of Germany (3.00)

Studies the course of German history from 1815 to 1945. Emphasizes the age of revolution, the evolution of German nationalism, the unification movement, Bismarck and Imperial Germany, the First World War and Versailles, the Weimar Republic, Hitler and the Third Reich and Germany's involvement in World War II. Also emphasizes the origins of the Third Reich.

HS 468E-W Topics in European History (3.00)

Provides and in-depth analysis of topics such as economic and social history, women and gender, or religion and the Cold War.

HS 469E-W Frame of Reference (3.00)

Provides an in-depth analysis of topics such as economic and social history, women and gender, or religion, and the Cold War.

HS 477 Greater Middle East 1500-Present (3.00)

Focuses on the transition of the Ottoman Empire and Iran from far-ranging multicultural economic centers to artificial nation-states imposed by European power, culminating in current conflicts.

Cross listing(s): PJ 477.

HS 483E-W Model League of Arab States: (3.00)

A combined small seminar and simulation experience in which students study a member state and issues within a League of Arab States, and then represent that state in a 3-4 day simulation at a host university.

HS 489E-W Topics in East Asian History: (3.00)

Provides an in-depth analysis of a significant East Asian problem. Content varies from year to year. May include the communist revolution in China, the Meiji Restoration, the Nanjing (Nationalist) Decade in China, Japanese democracy in the inter-war years, the Korean War or imperialism in East Asia. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing and permission of instructor.

HS 490E-W Independent Study/History: (1.00 - 3.00)

Offers an opportunity for independent exploration of areas of interest under the direction of a department member. Prerequisite(s): Approval of Department Chair.

HS 495E-W Seminar in History: (3.00)

Focuses on the application of research methodology appropriate to the seminar topic.

HS 495J Reading Seminar in History (3.00)

One of two seminars in historiography required of all History majors, the Reading Seminar focuses on critical analysis of selected themes in historical writing. The Reading Seminar is team-taught by members of the History faculty.

HS 495K Research Seminar in History (3.00)

One of two seminars in historiography required of all History majors, students in the Research Seminar engage in the process of researching, writing, and presenting a major seminar paper. The Research Seminar is supervised by the History faculty.

HS 498E-W Internship/History (3.00)

Provides practical experience in applied history. Students are placed according to their interest at national archives, museums, historical societies, public interest groups, nonprofit organizations, international businesses, at the local, regional, national or international level. Includes research work in history with the Department's faculty.

HS 499 Integrated Capstone (3.00)

Draws on historiography and theory from disciplines of History and Politics. Students complete a summative research writing with advising from History and Politics faculty.

POL 200 Sustainability & Collapse in World Hist (3.00)

Takes an evidence-based, case study, theoretical and integrative approach to the challenge of sustainability across world history. Draws on disciplines of history, politics, and international studies.

Cross listing(s): HS 200.

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