Studying Sociology at Regis

The sociology program at Regis is designed to provide knowledge of social interactions and social institutions. Specifically, a degree in sociology gives students the tools to critically examine culture, the environment, social class, race and ethnic relations, the global community, and the criminal justice system.
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B.A. in Sociology

Degree Overview

The Bachelor of Arts in sociology studies social interaction, collective behavior, and the ways people construct their society. Sociology also examines the structural causes of social problems and social welfare studies social interaction, collective behavior and the ways people together construct their society. It is an exciting way of looking at our lives and the world around us. A degree in sociology gives students the tools to critically examine culture, the environment, social class, race and ethnic relations, the global community, and the criminal justice system. This degree will give students the research and writing skills that are necessary to either pursue graduate work or to work in the community.

Students who are interested in people, in working with people, in understanding the ways our social institutions, such as work, education, and family help to shape us. Our students gain analytical and research skills, a deeper appreciation for identity and diversity, a comprehension of world events and an ability to read media critically, and an awareness of themselves as responsible citizens.

Program Requirements

Listed below are the required courses for completion of this degree at Regis University. Please note that recent course requirement updates may not be reflected in the list below and you should contact the Office of Enrollment Services at 303.458.4126 for recent changes and updates.

This degree program requires 128.00 credit hours for completion. Please contact your advisor or the Office of Enrollment Services at 303.458.4126.

Regis College: Core Requirements

Economics

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(3-6 SH)
Take 1 of the following groups:
Group 1: EC 200 - Intro to the American Economy
Group 2: EC 320 - Principles of Macroeconomics
and
EC 330 - Principles of Microeconomics

EN 250 - Literature Matters

Introduces the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama, with an emphasis on works that have had a profound influence on our world. Students will write a series of analytical essays, including at least one research essay.

Pre-requisite: TAKE RCC*200

Fine Arts

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(3SH)
Take three (3) semester hours of Fine Arts
from the following courses:
any 200-level FAC course, FAHS 211, FAHS 212

Foreign Language

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(6-8SH)
Take two classes in one language

Foundational

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(6 SH)
Take 1 of the following groups:
Group 1: RCC 200 - Writing Analytically (Fall)
Communicative Intensive (Spring)
Group 2: Commitment Program Students
RCC 200A - Writing Analytically A (Fall)
RCC 200B - Writing Analytically B (Spring)
Group 3: Honors Program Students
RCC 200H - Honors Writing Seminar (Fall)
RCC 300H - Honors Trad & Innovation (Spring)

History

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(3SH)
Three (3) credits from any 200-level History course

Integrative

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(12SH)
Take all of the following courses:
RCC 400D (Group 1), RCC 410E (Group 2),
RCC 420J (Group 3), RCC 430M (Group 4)

Mathematics

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(3-4SH)
Take one of the following Mathematics course:
MT 201, MT 204, MT 270, MT 270C, MT 272, MT 272C
MT 360A, MT 360B

Natural Science

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(4SH)
Take one Natural Science course (Group 1) with the
accompanying lab (Group 2).
Eligible courses include:
BL( 204/5E-W, 208/9, 216/17, 260/1, 262/3), ENVS 250/1,
GE 208/9, PH (202A, 205A, 304A, 305A),
AS 250/1 (Non-Science majors),
NS 260/1 (cannot be counted for Psychology Majors)

Philosophy

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(3SH)
Take one of the following Philosophy courses:
PL 270, PL 270C, PL 270H, PL 270P

Public Speaking

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(3SH)
Speech Communication

Religious Studies

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(3SH)
Any 300 level RT course

RT 201 - Religion and the Human Quest

Considering human existence in relation to the sacred and drawing on Eastern and Western religious traditions, this course explores religious perspectives on human questions about life, suffering, goodness, and ultimacy.

Cross listing(s): RT 201C.

Social Science

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(3SH)
Take three (3) semester hours from the following course list
ED 204, POL 215, POL 231, POL 241, PY 250, PY 250C, PY 250H,
SO 200, SO 200C, SO 203, AN/SO 204, PJ 200

RC: Sociology Major

Electives

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Take fifteen (15) upper division semester hours of
Sociology (SO) courses.

SO 200/200C

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(3SH)
Intrduction to Sociology

SO 204 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Introduces the methods and theory of cultural anthropology through a theoretical and comparative examination of the role of culture in human life. Includes the study of other cultures and field research on contemporary United States culture.

Cross listing(s): AN 204.

SO 300 - Writing As An Anthro/Sociologist

Develops an understanding of the formal schooling influences on individuals and ways society affects educational institutions. Explores information and tools used to understand and succeed in the educational system. Note: Majors and Minors only

Cross listing(s): AN 300.

SO 403 - Sociological Theory

Surveys major analytic models used in sociology. Reviews classical foundations of social thought, including the works of Marx, Durkheim and Weber, and contemporary schools of thought, such as feminist and neo-Marxian theory.

SO 404 - Methods of Social Research

Practical introduction to social science research methods including survey research, content analysis, participant observation, and field research.

Cross listing(s): AN 404 PJ 408.

SO 405 - Stories/Numbers:Quantitative Analysis

Develops literacy for basic tools of data analysis from univariate and inferential statistics to simple regression. Develops the ability to use critical thinking and computer programs to accurately assess meaning and validity of data as well as reported results of others.

Pre-requisite: TAKE AN*404 OR PJ*408 OR SO*404;

SO 499 - Majors Seminar

Capstone course provides Sociology majors with information on graduate school, employment opportunities and particular ways their knowledge can be used to contribute to the community. Students are encouraged to participate in the community during this course.

Course Descriptions

Listed below are the available courses offered at Regis University within this respective degree program. The courses below include the degree program requirements as well as subject related courses. Please contact the Office of Enrollment Services at 303.458.4126 for recent changes and updates.

AN 300 Writing As An Anthro/Sociologist (3.00)

Develops an understanding of the formal schooling influences on individuals and ways society affects educational institutions. Explores information and tools used to understand and succeed in the educational system. Note: Majors and Minors only

Cross listing(s): SO 300.

SO 200 Introduction to Sociology (3.00)

Studies sociological perspectives, focusing on social groups and social interaction. Presents basic sociological terms and concepts, and examines a variety of social institutions and processes.

Cross listing(s): SO 200C.

SO 203 Social Problems (3.00)

Surveys selected social problems from a national and international scope. Includes analysis of possible causes and consequences of these problems and of various proposals for solutions and reforms.

SO 204 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3.00)

Introduces the methods and theory of cultural anthropology through a theoretical and comparative examination of the role of culture in human life. Includes the study of other cultures and field research on contemporary United States culture.

Cross listing(s): AN 204.

SO 300 Writing As An Anthro/Sociologist (3.00)

Develops an understanding of the formal schooling influences on individuals and ways society affects educational institutions. Explores information and tools used to understand and succeed in the educational system. Note: Majors and Minors only

Cross listing(s): AN 300.

SO 403 Sociological Theory (3.00)

Surveys major analytic models used in sociology. Reviews classical foundations of social thought, including the works of Marx, Durkheim and Weber, and contemporary schools of thought, such as feminist and neo-Marxian theory.

SO 404 Methods of Social Research (3.00)

Practical introduction to social science research methods including survey research, content analysis, participant observation, and field research.

Cross listing(s): AN 404 PJ 408.

SO 405 Stories/Numbers:Quantitative Analysis (3.00)

Develops literacy for basic tools of data analysis from univariate and inferential statistics to simple regression. Develops the ability to use critical thinking and computer programs to accurately assess meaning and validity of data as well as reported results of others.

Pre-requisite: TAKE AN*404 OR PJ*408 OR SO*404;

SO 407 Public Anthropology (3.00)

Discusses anthropology's insights on culture and research techniques as means to analyze social, political, and economic problems and develop solutions. Focuses on the ways in which applied anthropology can analyze, inform, and influence policy in the United States and abroad, demonstrating anthropology's mainstream relevance.

Pre-requisite: AN*204 SO*200 SO*204

Cross listing(s): AN 407.

SO 411 Food, Gender, and Culture (3.00)

Explores ways in which preparing, eating, and thinking about food reflects culturally determined gender and power relations in societies around the world.

Cross listing(s): AN 411 WS 411 WGS 411.

SO 412 Food Justice (3.00)

Explores our relationship with food through analysis of power, privilege, and culture. Learn ways to change the alienation, structural violence, and injustice experienced within dominant systems of food production and consumption.

Cross listing(s): PJ 426 AN 412.

SO 416 Deviance (3.00)

Provides a historical and comparative study of social deviance, including definitions of and reactions to deviance, and deviance as collective behavior. Examines various sociological theories of deviance, and social groups and behaviors defined as deviant in the United States and other countries. NOTE: One 200-level Sociology or Anthropology course required.

Cross listing(s): CJ 416 CR 416.

SO 419E-W Culture and Consciousness: (3.00)

Explores the social and cultural processes through which we construct our world. Includes the sociology of knowledge, symbolic interactionism, phenomenological sociology, ethnomethodolgy, cultural studies and related topics.

Pre-requisite: SO*200

SO 422 Diversity in U.S. Society (3.00)

Provides a critical and comparative analysis of race, ethnicity and other diversity in the United States. Includes racism, creation and maintenance of ethnic group status, political processes and movements for self-determination.

Cross listing(s): CJ 422 CR 422 PJ 422.

SO 423 Mexican Americans in the U.S. (3.00)

Provides a general overview of Mexican Americans in the United States in contemporary society. Examines the history, culture, and past and present policies that have affected the community. Emphasizes racism, discrimination, prejudice, internal colonialism, split labor market theory, immigration, participation in social movements, and experiences within the various social institutions such as the economy, politics, media, education, and the family.

Cross listing(s): AN 423.

SO 424 Sex, Gender, and Society (3.00)

Examines the social construction of gender difference and stereotypes in the US and other cultures. Performs critical analysis of biological, sociological, anthropological, historical, and psychological explanations of masculinity and femininity. Includes intersections between gender and ethnicity, sexual orientation, social class, friendship, love, work, and disability.

Cross listing(s): WS 424 WGS 424.

SO 425 Native Americans (3.00)

Provides a general overview of Native Americans of North America. Examines the history, past and present social policies and treaties, and the American Indian Movement. Explores concepts such as racism, discrimination, prejudice, and internal colonialism.

SO 439 Black Social Thought (3.00)

Focuses on African-American social thought and the West African influence from historical, political, sociological and cultural perspectives from pre-1492 to present day. Includes intensive pre-departure seminars, a two-week Ghanaian service-oriented field experience and service in Denver communities.

Cross listing(s): PJ 439.

SO 441 Sustainable Communities (3.00)

Explores social, environmental, and economic issues that prevent and encourage more sustainable communities. Topics include transportation, sprawl, poverty, urban/wildlife interface, housing, population, consumption, municipal/toxic waste, community resources and empowerment, and a variety of proposed solutions from around the world.

Cross listing(s): ENVS 441 PJ 441.

SO 450 Criminology (3.00)

Analyzes social, political and economic dynamics of crime including: corporate and government crime, racism and sexism in the criminal justice system, and imprisonment.

Cross listing(s): CJ 450 CR 450.

SO 451 Juvenile Delinquency (3.00)

Investigates juvenile delinquency in the context of social and political authority, the operations of the criminal justice system, youth culture and youth subcultures, and related social issues. Presents various sociological theories of juvenile delinquency, and examines various historical and contemporary manifestations of juvenile crime and deviance.

Cross listing(s): CR 451.

SO 452 Punishment and Corrections (3.00)

Provides historical, political and economic analysis of the panel system in the United States.

Cross listing(s): CJ 452 PJ 452 CR 452.

SO 459E-W Topics in Crime and Justice (3.00)

Selected courses will focus on issues related to crime, police, the court system, punishment, social control, rehabilitation, etc.

Pre-requisite: SO*350 OR CJ*350

Cross listing(s): CR 459E-W CJ 459E-W.

SO 460 Social Movements (3.00)

Examines a variety of U.S. social movements from the 1950's through the present. Explores theoretical questions of how movements emerge, who joins them, the effect of various tactics, and the factors that contribute to a movements' success or demise.

Cross listing(s): PJ 460.

SO 464 Stand Up & Fight: Community Organizing (3.00)

Presents history, theory and strategies of community organizing in the United States, and experience of community organizing techniques by developing and implementing a community organizing project on the Regis campus or working with the local community organizers.

Pre-requisite: SO*200;

Cross listing(s): PJ 464.

SO 469E-W Topics in Culture (3.00)

Analysis of origins, development, and changes/challenges of ancient and/or modern cultures.

Pre-requisite: TAKE SO*200 OR AN*204;

Cross listing(s): AN 469E-W.

SO 470 Social Inequality (3.00)

Provides a comparative examination of theoretical and ethnographic patterns of inequality in the United States and other countries.

Cross listing(s): PJ 427.

SO 472 Wealth and Power (3.00)

Provides a comparative examination of political and economic institutions, the groups that dominate these institutions, the means by which they exercise power and challenges to the exercise of power.

Cross listing(s): EC 472 HO 478L.

SO 474 Modern Slavery and Trafficking (3.00)

Modern Slavery and human trafficking in global perspective. Covers sex trafficking, bonded labor, forced labor, child soldiers, chattel slavery, and domestic servant slavery. Explores the role of the state, organized crime, the media, culture, corruption, and debates about prostitution. Includes testimonies by survivors research reports, theoretical essays, policy statements, expert testimonies, and videos.

Pre-requisite: TAKE SO*200 OR PJ*400;

Cross listing(s): PJ 474 CR 474.

SO 475 Globalization and Revolution (3.00)

Critical examination of economic, social, and political instruments of globalization, revolution, and social change around the world.

Pre-requisite: SO*200

Cross listing(s): PJ 475.

SO 485 Anthropology of Religion (3.00)

Provides an anthropological examination of religious expression in past and present societies. Includes myth, ritual, shamanism, symbolism and religious change.

Pre-requisite: SO*200 SO*204 AN*204

Cross listing(s): AN 485 RC 425E.

SO 486 Mass Communication and Society (3.00)

Investigates and analyzes economic, political and ideological dimensions of mass communication, mass communication and social control, and the development of mass media forms.

Cross listing(s): COM 486.

SO 490E-W Independent Study in Sociology (1.00 - 3.00)

Offers an opportunity for individual study of an approved topic in sociology under the direction of a sociology faculty member. Permits faculty and students to explore together some subject of special or personal interest.

Pre-requisite: SO*200

SO 491 Community Social Change Seminar I (3.00)

Weekly seminar. Includes readings on University/Community collaborations, community based research and social change, as well as the implementation and completion of a community project in collaboration with community partners.

SO 492 Community Social Change Seminar II (3.00)

Weekly seminar. Includes readings on University/Community collaborations, community based research and social change, as well as the implementation and completion of a community project in collaboration with community partners.

Pre-requisite: TAKE SO*491;

SO 496E-W Topics in Sociology: (3.00)

Offers selected topics including sociology of medicine, community and urban studies.

SO 498E-M Internship in Sociology (1.00 - 3.00)

Provides an intensive work experience appropriate to the sociology discipline.

SO 499 Majors Seminar (3.00)

Capstone course provides Sociology majors with information on graduate school, employment opportunities and particular ways their knowledge can be used to contribute to the community. Students are encouraged to participate in the community during this course.

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