Summer Growth

Summer in Colorado is an energetic time, full of opportunities. Fulfill core or major requirements or investigate a new area of interest through Regis University's summer courses.

Mission of Summer Session

Inspired by the Jesuit vision of education, Regis College Summer Session is dedicated to the development of the whole person, the pursuit of academic excellence, the advancement of scholarship, the service of faith and the promotion of justice. Summer Session provides its students and the local community with outstanding and innovative educational experiences through on and off-campus programs.

Tuition Rates

Regis College Summer Session offers a reduced tuition rate. Tuition for Summer Session 2016 is $460 per credit hour.

Alumni may audit a course for a discounted rate of $150 per course.


Scholarships and financial aid are available for summer session courses. Please see the Financial Aid & Scholarships tab for more information about financial assistance through Regis College.

Summer Session 2016 - Important Dates

On-Campus Courses

 

Eight Week Online Courses

 

Sixteen Week Courses

 

Session 3W1

 

Session 3W2

 

Session 3W3

 

Session 6W1

 

Session SUV

 

Session SEM

 

First Day of Online Registration for Courses and Summer Housing

 

March  29

 

March 29

 

March 29

 

March 29

 

March 29

 

March 28

 

First Day of In-Person and Mail-In Registration

 

April 8

 

April 8

 

April 8

 

April 8

 

April 8

 

April 8

 

Summer Session Scholarship Application Due

 

April 8

 

April 8

 

April 8

April 8

 

April 8

 

April 8

 

Last Day to Register for Summer Housing

 

April 15

 

April 15

 

April 15

 

April 15

 

April 15

 

April 15

 

Tuition Due

 

May 1

 

May 1

 

May 1

 

May 1

 

May 1

 

May 1

 

Session Begins

 

May 2

 

May 23

 

June 13

 

May 23

 

May 2

 

May 2

 

Last Day of Registration, Add/Drop, Pass/Fail

 

May 2

 

May 23

 

June 13

 

May 31

 

May 9

 

May 9

 

Last Day to Withdraw

 

May 16

 

June 6

 

June 27

 

June 21

 

June 10

 

July 22

 

Session Ends

 

May 20

 

June 10

 

July 1

 

July 1

 

June 24

 

August 19

 

Memorial Day - No Class

 

N/A

 

May 30

 

N/A

 

May 30

 

May 30

 

May 30

 

Independence day - No Class

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

July 4

 

Student Responsibility

It is the responsibility of the student enrolling in Summer Session courses to read the Regis University Catalog. The information contained on this website is provided only as a ready reference, and in the case of any discrepancy the Regis University Catalog will prevail. All information, including course offerings, is subject to change without notice or obligation. It is the students’ responsibility to check their Regis University email in order to receive accurate information concerning the status of their course(s).

How and when can I register for Summer Session 2016?

Students are advised to register as early as possible in order to avoid enrollment caps on class sizes or cancellation due to low enrollment.

  • Online registration through WebAdvisor for current Regis College students will begin March 29, 2016. Directions for how to complete the online registration process may be found here
    • Registration by mail or by email for students who are not affiliated with Regis University will begin March 29, 2016, and run through the end of add/drop for each particular session.
      • Session 3W1 add/drop May 2
      • Session 3W2 add/drop May 23
      • Session 6W1 add/drop June 13 
      • Sessions SUV and SEM add/drop May 9
    • Internships: Students intending to complete a summer internship are not allowed to register through the Summer Session course registration form or through the online registration system. Please contact Melinda Taylor, Director of the Academic Internship Program, by phone at 303.964.5234 and/or by email at mtaylor004@regis.edu. More information concerning internship opportunities through Regis College may be found online at www.regis.edu/collegeinterns.

    As a Regis College Student, will enrolling in summer session courses make me ineligible for the Regis Guarantee?

    No. Summer Session courses do not interfere with your eligibility for the Regis Guarantee. For more information, visit our Regis Guarantee page.

    Is there a limit to how many Summer Session courses I may take?

    Students may not register for more than a total of 12 credit hours within a particular year’s Summer Session without the approval of the Regis College Associate Dean.

    I enrolled in a Summer Session course, but I now need to drop it. How do I do this?

    Please check the add/drop deadline for your course to confirm you are eligible. [Please check the important dates under the overview tab].
    If you still are within the add/drop window for your course, you should be able to drop the course online through WebAdvisor. If you encounter any issues with that process, contact Academic Records & Registration to complete the process. They may be reached by: Email: registrar@regis.edu Phone: 303.458.4126 or 1.800.568.8932 (6 a.m.to 10 p.m., Monday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday) In-person: 4th Floor Main Hall

    I enrolled in a Summer Session course, but I now need to withdraw from it. How do I do this?

    Please check both the add/drop and withdraw deadlines for your course confirm that add/drop has closed for your course and you are still within the timeframe that will permit you to withdraw from a course. [Please check the important dates under the overview tab].

    If you are within the withdraw period and are on-campus taking a course, please complete the online Course Withdrawal Form that may be found here.

    If you are completing an out-of-state internship, please email your request to sprochaz@regis.edu or ldesisto@regis.edu to have the withdraw process completed.

    ***Important Note: Withdrawing from a course could result in some or all of tuition still being owed. If you decide to withdraw from a course, please complete this process as promptly as possible.

    Is it possible to audit a Summer Session course?

    Yes, students are permitted to audit for the purpose of personal enrichment and exploration with written permission from the Regis College Associate Dean. Students auditing a course are expected to participate in the course, maintain normal attendance, and complete course assignments, although they are exempt from assigned tests. Those students will receive an “AU” grade with no credit earned and will be charged the regular tuition rate. Exercising the audit option must be completed by the Add/Drop deadline.

    I am on Academic Probation through Regis College, may I take courses during Summer Session?

    Regis College students on academic probation may register for one course per session for a maximum of six credit hours. If a student is placed on academic probation after registering for summer courses, the Associate Dean will contact the student to arrange a drop for any extraneous course(s).

    I am not a Regis College Student, may I register?

    Yes! The Summer Session Registration Form may be found here. Please contact us for additional instructions; we are happy to help you via phone or email.

    • Regis University Alumni who would like to audit a summer session course may do so at a reduced tuition rate of $150 per course. The course may not be audited if it is at capacity. We must receive the Alumni Audit request 2 weeks prior to the start of the summer session term in which the course will be offered. More information on this opportunity, including information on how to look up a class, can be found on their Web page.
    • Non-Regis Students who attend another college or university and wish to take summer classes without intending to work toward a degree at Regis may enroll as a summer student. While it is not necessary to file their school’s transcript with Regis University to attend Summer Session, it is advisable that they secure approval from their institution to register for Regis College Summer Session.
    • Non-Regis Students who wish to enroll at Regis University as a degree-seeking students should contact the Office of Admissions at 303.964.4900 or RUAdmissions@regis.edu.
    • Non-Degree Seeking Students wishing to further their education may enroll as summer students. Students wishing to pursue this option must create a user account through the Admissions Office.
    • High School Students may enroll in a Regis summer class with the approval of the instructor and the Regis College Associate Dean. A written recommendation is required from their principal or a high school faculty member in the academic discipline of the summer course in which they wish to enroll.

    Is it possible to have access to on-campus housing during summer session?

    • On-campus housing is available to undergraduate students enrolled in Summer Session. Availability is limited.
    • More information regarding summer housing can be found online. Students must be enrolled in a summer course to stay on campus during the summer.
    • Students with additional questions should contact the Office of Residence Life, Housing and Event Services at 303.458.4991 or by email at reslife@regis.edu.

    What student services are available during summer session?

    • Learning Commons: Writing Center and Tutoring Services
      • The Learning Commons provides free academic support services during the summer semester. Writing Consultants can meet with clients online or in person and offer assistance on any aspect of the writing process, ranging from brainstorming to revising. Tutoring Services will be available in a variety of subjects. To learn more about out offerings and to schedule an appointment, visit our homepage.
    • Student Disability Services
    • Library 
    • Dining: On campus dining services are available during limited hours in the summer. Please visit their webpage for additional information.
    • Lowell Campus Bookstore summer hours:
      • Monday – Thursday: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m
      • Friday: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
      • Closed Saturday and Sunday
    • Fitness Center summer hours: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. (Subject to Change)
    • Counseling and Personal Development office hours: Monday - Friday: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.; Phone: 303.458.3507
    • Student Health Services summer hours:

      • Monday through Friday: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.; closed for lunch from 1-2 p.m.
      • Availability is subject to change and will be posted on the office door.

    Schedule Changes

    Please note that Regis University reserves the right to cancel any course that does not draw adequate registration and to set maximum limits for enrollment in certain classes. Two weeks before the start of each summer term, classes that have not met their enrollment requirements will be evaluated for cancellation.

    Important Note about Integrative Core Courses (RCC 400-Level)

    Students who need to take more than one integrative core course during Summer Session may not do so during the same term. Students who ignore this rule will be forced to drop a RCC 400-level course.

     

    Session 3W1: May 2 - May 20, 2016

    Course Title Credits Days Time Instructor
    BA 407 Leadership Principles 3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Bauman, D
    COM 250 Speaking to Make a Difference
    3 M-F  9:00am-12:00pm Sobel, M
    COM 464E Independent Film 3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Hill, J
    EN 250
    Literature Matters
    3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Dimovitz, S
    HS 232
    World History Since 1500
    3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Sanders, E
    PE 420 Outdoor Recreational Leadership 3 M-R 9:00am-1:00pm Williams,N

    PL 486

    RT 465E

    Philosophical and Religious Themes in Film
    3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm DiSanto, R
    PY 250
    General Psychology
    3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Basham, M
    RCC 420J


    PL 448N


    PJ 495R
    Justice and the Common Good: Drugs and Society


    Special Topics in Ethics: Drugs and Society


    Selected Topics in Peace and Justice: Drugs and Society
    3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Gosselin, A
    SP 209A Elementary Spanish I 4 M-F 8:30am-12:30pm Carrion, G
    SP 423 Translation/Interpretation/Composition 3 M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Medina, E
    SP 424 Spanish for the Medical and Health Care Worker 3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Medina, E

    Session 3W2: May 23 - June 10, 2016

    Course Title Credits Days Time Instructor
    HS 224 US Since 1865
    3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Gonzales, N

    RCC 400D

    RT 450I

    WGS 485U

    Diversity and Culture:Women and Gender in Islam

     

     

    3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Ahmad, F
    RCC 410E

    Global Environmental Awareness:

     Issues in World Eco-Literature

    3
    M-F 9:00am-12:00pm McGill, F
    RCC 430M
    Search for Meaning:  The Meaningful Athlete
    3
    M-F 1:00pm-4:00pm Zenzinger, T
    SP 209B Elementary Spanish II 4 M-F 8:30am-12:30pm Bourg, C
    SP 417
     Business Communication and Culture in Spanish
    3 M-F 9:00am-12:00pm Marquez-Jimenez, W.

    Session 3W3: June 13 - July 1, 2016

    Course Title Credits Days Time Instructor




    Session 6W1: May 23 - July 1, 2016

    Course Title Credits Days Time Instructor
    BL 276 Introduction to Human Physiology 3 TR 8:45am-12:30pm Campisi, J
    BL 277 Human Physiology Laboratory 1 TR 1:30pm-5:00pm Campisi, J
    CH 230 General Chemistry II 4 MWF 9:30am-12:50pm Sorauf, K 
    CH 231 General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 TR  1:30pm-5:00pm Sorauf, K 
    NS 260 Introduction to Brain and Behavior 3 WF
    8:45am-12:30pm Basham, M
    NS 261
    Introduction to Brain and Behavior Laboratory
    1 WF 1:30pm-5:00pm Basham, M
    PH 202A
    General Physics with Trigonometry I
    3 M-R

    10:00am-12:00pm and

    2:00pm-4:00pm

    Ray, S
    PH 205A
    General Physics Lab with Trigonometry I
    1 M-R

     10:00am-12:00pm and

    2:00pm-4:00pm

    Ray, S

    Session SUV Online Courses: May 4 - June 26, 2016

    Course Title Credits Instructor
    AN 204

    Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    *4 week course (July 11-August 8, 2016)

    3 Isik, D
    MT 270 Introduction to Statistics 3 Patnott, M
    MT 272 Statistics for Life Sciences 3 Patnott, M
    RT 302
    Faith and Justice in World Christianity
    3 Conley, A
    RT 305 Belief and Unbelief 3 Conley, A

    Session SEM: Anthropology Practicum: May 2-August 19, 2016

    The practicum course in community food systems begins and ends in the garden.  Students will walk away with this course with a more intimate understanding of the planning and implementation of a small one acre organic urban garden. 



    Session SEM: Travel Learning - Costa Rica, May 24-June 19, 2016

    Travel Dates
    May 24th - June 19th, 2016 (with pre and post meetings during spring and fall semesters)

    Course Title Credits Instructor
    BL 204T Introduction to Primate Behavior 3 Schreier, A
    BL 205T Primate Behavior Laboratory 1 Schreier, A
    BL 462 Primate Ecology and Behavior 3 Schreier, A
    ENVS 462 Primate Ecology and Behavior 3 Schreier, A

    Session SEM: Travel Learning - Colorado, June 6-June 15, 2016

    On-Campus Sessions
    June 1 and 2, 2016 and June 17, 2016

    Travel Dates
    June 6, 2016-June 15, 2016

    Course Title Credits Instructor
    GE 204 Geology of Colorado 3 Sakulich, J.
    GE 205 Geology of Colorado Lab 1 Sakulich, J.

    Session SEM: Summer Internships: May 2 – August 19, 2016

    Summer internships are available in every major and minor. Juniors and seniors may do a summer internship for credit by enrolling in the appropriate 498 internship course. The minimum number of internship hours required is 120, but these must be spread over the entire summer semester (12-15 weeks). Generally, students work 10-15 hours per week at their internship site for most of the summer. Students must also complete all of their professor’s academic requirements.

    Minimum GPA required: 2.8

    Both the Director of the Academic Internship Program and the internship professor must approve the placement before the student can be registered for the 498 course. Registration takes place in Loyola 1 only. For more information about requirements and help finding a summer internship, visit the website (www.regis.edu/collegeinterns) or contact Melinda Taylor, mtaylor004@regis.edu.


    Anthropology

    AN 204 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
    Introduces the methods and theory of cultural anthropology through a theoretical and comparative examination of the role of human life.  Includes the study of cultural practices such as language, myth, gender, marriage, and sexuality, and economic and political practices in different cultures of the world.  Cross listing: SO204

    AN 495 Practicum in Community Food Systems (1-2)
    The practicum course in community food systems begins and ends in the garden.  Students will walk away from this course with a more intimate understanding of the planning and implementation of a small one acre organic urban garden.  This course will cover biointensive and permaculture approaches to food production.  Utilizing these skills students will be able to produce food and will understand how the production of food is an important aspect of the community food system.  This course will also examine the relationship between food production, distribution, processing and consumption.

    Biology

    BL 204T Introduction to Primate Behavior (3)
    Introduces students to scientific inquiry in context of a focused biological topic. Develops student knowledge of biological content and includes discussion of relevant societal and ethical issues. NOTE: This course has been approved to satisfy the core natural science with laboratory requirement when taken with BL 205E-W. Co requisite: BL 205E-W. NOTE: Course runs in Session SEM: May 2-August 19. Trip fee required.

    BL 205T Primate Behavior Laboratory (1)

    Introduces students to scientific inquiry through participation. Involves exercises accompanying and reinforcing lecture content. NOTE: Course runs in Session SEM: May 2-August 19. Trip fee required.

    BL 276 Introduction to Human Physiology (3)
    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to human physiology, including neurophysiology, endocrinology, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal physiology. Prerequisite: High school chemistry or one semester of college chemistry or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: BL 277. Note: Required for Nursing or Pre-Physical Therapy students.

    BL 277 Introduction to Human Physiology Laboratory (1)
    This course involves laboratory exercises accompanying and reinforcing lecture topics. Co-requisite: BL 276.

    BL 462 Primate and Ecology Behavior (3)

    Explores the ecology and evolution of primates in the context of their biotic and abiotic environments. Emphasizes primate life history, behavior, social organization and conservation ecology. Prerequisite(s): BL 260 and BL 262. Cross listing: ENVS 462. NOTE: Course runs in Session SEM: May 2-August 19. Trip fee required.

    Business

    BA 407 Leadership Principles (3)
    Examines evolution of leadership from theoretical perspective with a focus on contemporary leadership. Topics include: management versus leadership, gender differences, power and social influence, ethics and values, culture and the key communication competencies of leadership. Requires students to evaluate and enhance personal leadership skills and develop a personal model of leadership. Prerequisite: BA 461. NOTE: This course is offered through the College of Business and Economics.

    Chemistry

    CH 230 General Chemistry II (4)
    This course is a continuation of CH 210. Students will examine the following fundamental chemical principles: equilibrium theory; acid-based chemistry; chemical kinetics; thermodynamics; and electrochemistry. Additional special topics may include transition metal chemistry, the chemistry of new materials, nuclear chemistry, and geochemistry. Prerequisite: CH 210. Co-requisite: CH 231.  A C- or better in CH 210 or permission of the instructor is required.

    CH 231 General Chemistry II Laboratory (1)
    This course is a continuation of fundamental lab techniques including chromatography, chemical synthesis, spectroscopy, and acid/base chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 211. Co-requisite: CH 230.

    Communication

    COM 250 Speaking to Make a Difference (3)
    This course provides an overview of the process of communication and introduces communication theory. Students will have practical training in the fundamentals of effective presentation for individuals in both public speaking and group communication settings. In addition, this course emphasizes discussion of contemporary issues and the analysis of public discourse.

    COM 464E Independent Film (3)
    This course introduces the technical evolution and history of film and the principles of aesthetic criticism, film analysis and the evolution of themes and genres. Students will consider basic elements of cinema including screen writing, direction, casting, production, cinematography, and editing. Prerequisite: COM 380

    English

    EN 250 Literature Matters (3)
    This class introduces the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama with an emphasis on works that have has a profound influence on our world. Students will write a series of analytical essays, including at least one research essay. Prerequisite: CCS 200 or RCC 200.


    Environmental Studies

    ENVS 462 Primate and Ecology Behavior (3)
    Explores the ecology and evolution of primates in the context of their biotic and abiotic environments. Emphasizes primate life history, behavior, social organization and conservation ecology. Prerequisite(s): BL 260 and BL 262. Cross listing: BL 462.  Trip fee required.

    Geology

    GE 204E Geology of Colorado (3)
    Colorado is an ideal location to study field geology.  The state’s geological formations and landforms, eastern plains, rugged mountains, volcanic areas of the southwest, and western deserts provide a diversity of environments unsurpassed by any other region in the world.  Colorado has more earth scientists per capita than anywhere on the planet, which  mean that the geology, landforms, hydrology, and soils of the state have been thoroughly studied and explored, resulting in a wealth of high-quality, Colorado-specific resources for students of the earth sciences.  Students in this course will use first-hand observation as the basis for analysis and discussion of the connections between the billion-year geologic history of Colorado and how humans have occupied the landscapes of the state.

    This course has been approved to satisfy the core natural science with laboratory requirement when taken with GE 205. Trip Fee Required

    GE 205F Geology of Colorado Laboratory (1)

    Co-requisite: GE 204  Trip Fee Required

    History

    HS 224 History of the U.S. Since 1865 (3)
    Studies the evolution of modern industrial United States from the end of the Civil War to the present.

    HS 232 World History Since 1500 (3)
    Traces the origins of an interdependent world through investigation of modern history in a global context.   Examines how Europe, relatively insignificant in 1500, came to dominate the globe by 1900.  Includes nationalism, decolonization, the Cold War, and then end of bipolarity.



    Mathematics

    MT 270 Introduction to Statistics (3)
    This course presents standard topics in introductory statistics for students whose major is not mathematics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, estimations, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation, and other topics. NOTE: Two years of High School Algebra required

    MT 272 Statistics for Life Sciences (3)
    This course presents introductory statistics emphasizing application in biology, psychology, neuroscience, and kinesiology. The course includes descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, regression, t-tests, Chi-square, and ANOVA with particular emphasis to analysis using p-scores. NOTE: Two years of High School Algebra required.

    Neuroscience

    NS 260 Introduction to Brain and Behavior (3)
    Introduces the scientific study of how the brain relates to behavior.  Explores how brain structure are involved in sensorimotor functions, motivation and emotion, cognition, and neurological disorders.  Co-requisite: NS 261

    NS 261 Introduction to Brain and Behavior Laboratory (1)
    Introduces scientific methods used to study brain-behavior relationships such as sensorimotor, emotional, and cognitive functions as well as neurological disorders and the effects of drugs on behavior.  Co-requisite: NS 260

    Peace and Justice

    PJ 495R Drugs and Society (3)
    This course explores the philosophical and justice issues around legal and illegal drug use, including personal identity, rationality and free will, excuses and punishment, social effect of drug use and distribution, and the correlation between drug use, mental illness and poverty. Prerequisite: RS 200 or RT 201

    Philosophy

    PL 448N Drugs and Society (3)
    This course explores the philosophical and justice issues around legal and illegal drug use, including personal identity, rationality and free will, excuses and punishment, social effect of drug use and distribution, and the correlation between drug use, mental illness and poverty. Prerequisite: RS 200 or RT 201

    PL 486 Philosophical and Religious Themes in Film (3)
    Integrates interests in grammar and meaning of film with inquires into the "big questions" that are abiding concerns of philosophy and religion.  Prerequisite: 200-level PL course or RT 201.

    Physics

    PH 202A General Physics with Trigonometry I (3)
    Discusses fundamental concepts of motion, including Newton's Laws and the conservation of energy, momentum, and angular momentum. Focuses on the development of quantitative and qualitative problem-solving skills. Co-requisite: PH 205A Prerequisite: MT 260 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

    PH 205A General Physics Lab with Trigonometry I (1)
    Complements PH 202A, providing practical, hands-on experience primarily with experiments related to mechanics. Co-requisite: PH 202A

    Psychology

    PY 250 General Psychology (3)
    The course introduces the science of behavior and mental processes through a systematic study of representative areas of psychology.

    Physical Education

    PE 420 Outdoor Recreational Leadership (3)
    This course includes instruction and practice of outdoor recreational and survival skills for the outdoor recreation enthusiast. Students will examine recreational facilities in terms of programming management and supervision. NOTE: Additional course fee and transportation required.

    Politics

    Regis College Core (RCC)

    RCC 400D Diversity and Culture: Woman and Gender in Islam (3)
    This course examines how Muslim women articulate their own status and issues in today's world.  This course gives students the tools to analyze the means by which Muslim women negotiate tradition and modernity and whether an Islamic feminism exists.  This course also reviews the specific challenges that Muslin women face from dogma, tradition, and culture. Prerequisite: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required

    RCC 410E Global Environmental Awareness:  Issues in World Eco-Literature (3)
    This course examines environmental issues in contemporary literature from various cultures to alalyze how these cultures' histories and values address current environmental problems. Students will research, write, and present about efforts to resolve environmental issues in the places we read about and will integrate various perspectives into their own responses to these issues.

    RCC 420J Justice and the Common Good: Drugs and Society (3)
    This course explores the philosophical and justice issues around legal and illegal drug use, including personal identity, rationality and free will, excuses and punishment, social effect of drug use and distribution, and the correlation between drug use, mental illness and poverty. Prerequisite: RS 200 or RT 201. Prerequisite: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required.

    RCC 430M Search for Meaning: The Meaning Athlete (3)

    Athletes, through sport, explore, ethical decisions, the mind and body, life and death, patriotism, sex and gender, play, beauty and race--explorations that offer insight into a meaningful life. Prerequisite: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required.

    Religious Studies

    RT 302 Faith and Justice in World Christianity (3)
    Examines how the enculturation of Christianity in different times and places produces distinctive beliefs about Jesus and engages the pursuit of justice in the context of religious and cultural injustice.  Prerequisite(s): RT 201/RT 201C.

    RT 305 Belief and Unbelief (3)
    Explores questions of belief and doubt from Christian and secular perspectives, for example, regarding science, philosophy, and the experience of suffering. Prerequisite(s): RT 201/RT 201

    RT 450I Women and Gender in Islam (3)
    This course examines how Muslim women articulate their own status and issues in today's world.  This course gives students the tools to analyze the means by which Muslim women negotiate tradition and modernity and whether an Islamic feminism exists.  This course also reviews the specific challenges that Muslin women face from dogma, tradition, and culture. Prerequisite: Junior standing or completion of Distributive Core required

    RT 465E Philosophical and Religious Themes in Film (3)
    Integrates interests in grammar and meaning of film with inquires into the "big questions" that are abiding concerns of philosophy and religion.  Prerequisite: 200-level PL course or RT 201.

    Spanish

    SP 209A Elementary Spanish I (4)
    This course provided a through grounding in essentials of grammar, oral drill, dictation, elementary and intermediate texts, conversation and written exercises.

    SP 209B Elementary Spanish II (4)
    This course is a continuation of SP 209A. Prerequisite: SP 209A or equivalent.

    SP 417 Business Communication and Culture in Spanish (3)
    The main objective of this course is to familiarize students with basic business concepts in Spanish and to provide an overview of commerce in a global economy with a focus on sustainable business practices in Latin America and Spain.

    SP 423 Translation/Interpretation/Composition (3)
    Offers practice in advanced composition. Translation, and stylistic analysis in Spanish to develop grammar, vocabulary, and analytic skills in a contemporary and realistic context. Prerequisite(s): SP 309B or equivalent.

    SP 424 Spanish for Medical and Health Care Workers (3)
    Provides Spanish students, medical and health care workers the opportunity to enhance communication skills with the vast number of Spanish speaking patients. Prerequisite(s): Two or more semesters of Spanish or permission of instructor. Majors and minors only.

    Sociology

    SO 204 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology  (3)
    Introduces the methods and theory of cultural anthropology through a theoretical and comparative examination of the role of human life.  Includes the study of cultural practices such as language, myth, gender, marriage, and sexuality, and economic and political practices in different cultures of the world.  Cross listing: AN 204

    SO 495 Practicum in Community Food Systems (1-2)
    The practicum course in community food systems begins and ends in the garden.  Students will walk away from this course with a more intimate understanding of the planning and implementation of a small one acre organic urban garden.  This course will cover biointensive and permaculture approaches to food production.  Utilizing these skills students will be able to produce food and will understand how the production of food is an important aspect of the community food system.  This course will also examine the relationship between food production, distribution, processing and consumption.

    Women and Gender Studies

    WGS 410I Race and Gender in American Culture (3)
    This course explores the intersection of homelessness, poverty, and gender. Community-based learning will help students understand the root causes of these issues, and they'll engage in local efforts to respond to homelessness in our community. Prerequisite(s): WGS 400 or RCC 200 or EN 320 and one 300-level English course.

    WGS 485U Women and Gender in Islam (3)
    This course examines how Muslim women articulate their own status and issues in today's world.  This course gives students the tools to analyze the means by which Muslim women negotiate tradition and modernity and whether an Islamic feminism exists.  This course also reviews the specific challenges that Muslin women face from dogma, tradition, and culture.


    Financial Aid

    To be eligible to receive financial aid, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), available at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Submitting the FAFSA allows students to apply for federal, state and institutional grants, loans, student employment and scholarships. Additional information about financial aid is available at www.regis.edu/financialaid.  If you intend to apply 2016-2017 financial aid funds to Summer Session, we recommend that you indicate Summer, Fall, and Spring semesters on your FAFSA application.

     

    • The 2016-2017 FAFSA applies to the Summer 2016, Fall 2016, and Spring 2017 semesters. Students are encouraged to submit their FAFSA between Jan. 1 and March 1 for maximum consideration for grants and scholarships, but FAFSA applications will be accepted until April 15th for students interested in financial aid assistance during the 2016-2017 academic year.
    • In order to make use of financial aid awards during Summer Session 2016, students must be enrolled in a minimum of 6 credit hours throughout the duration of Summer Session; however, if students are Pell and/or COF eligible, they may be able to enroll in fewer credits. Students should contact the Office of Financial Aid for advice concerning their particular financial aid needs and options
    • The Regis College Summer Financial Aid Application is due by May 1. The Summer Financial Aid Application form and deadline are separate from the Summer Session Scholarship Application. Students interested in applying for a Summer Session Scholarship will have to review and follow the directions associated with that program.

    Scholarships

    There are three kinds of scholarships available for Summer Session 2016:

     

    High Financial Need: A number of 3 credit hour scholarships will be available to students enrolled in Summer Session with high financial need whose tuition cannot be covered by their current financial aid package.

     

    • Students must enroll in at least one 3 credit hour Summer Session course to remain eligible for this scholarship. The scholarship will be revoked from students who drop or withdraw from their Summer Session courses.
    • Completion of a FAFSA is required, as well as this scholarship form. In order to be considered for this scholarship, students must submit their FAFSA by March 1, 2016 and their Summer Session Scholarship Form by April 8, 2016.
    Merit Scholarships: A number of 2 credit hour scholarships will be available to students enrolled in Summer Session who have a 3.2 cumulative GPA or higher and who actively embrace the Jesuit commitment to the question “How ought we to live?” through service and/or leadership to the Regis University community and surrounding areas.
    • Students must enroll in at least one 3 credit hour Summer Session course to remain eligible for this scholarship. The scholarship will be revoked from students who drop or withdraw from their Summer Session courses.
    • In order to be considered for this scholarship, students must submit their Summer Session Scholarship Form, along with the supplemental application materials, by April 8, 2016.
    • In a 250 word essay, students must address how they build upon the Undergraduate Core Educational Experience through work that embodies Regis College’s commitment to Ethical Inquiry and Reflection, a Concern for Justice, Global Awareness, and/or  Leadership in the Service of Others.
    • Students must also provide the names and contact information for 3 faculty members willing to serve as a reference.
    Travel Learning Scholarships: A number of 2 credit hour scholarships will be available to students enrolled in a travel learning course.
    • Students must be an accepted member of a Summer Session 2016 Travel Learning course to be eligible for this scholarship. The scholarship will be revoked from students who drop or withdraw from their Travel Learning course.
    • In order to be considered for this scholarship, students must submit their Summer 2016 Scholarship Form, along with the supplemental application materials, by April 8, 2016.

      NOTE: Some Travel Learning programs will require an earlier deadline for this scholarship application. Please see the Travel Learning website  or contact the Associate Dean for more information.
    • Recipients of this scholarship must agree to work with their faculty member(s) and the Associate Dean to develop a plan for how they will share their academic and cultural experiences from their Travel Learning course with the wider Regis University community upon returning to campus.