It's Not Your Average Freshman Year

Expecting to sit anonymously in a 200-person lecture? That's not our style. Your first courses as a Regis student will be experiential. They are a platform for service and an opportunity to engage in meaningful research with faculty. From tutoring in Denver schools to operating a virtual small business, your first classes at Regis will will be anything but boring. These aren't your average freshman composition and core classes. We won't ask you to be right, but rather think critically, express your ideas, listen to the ideas of others, and ask introspective questions. 

Review the fall semester RCC 200 Writing Analytically and Spring communication intensive course combinations below. These paired courses are seminar-styled and focus on critical reading and communication - both written and presentation skills. Your chosen pair will also serve as an orientation to college life, with an added thought-provoking Jesuit twist. And, when you progress into your spring semester course, it will be with the same classmates from the fall. 

Take a peek at the course titles below, and dive into the descriptions. This isn't your average class. Excited? Once you've narrowed down your top three choices complete the online advising form so we can start planning your very first semester of college at Regis University. It's going to be great!

Course Descriptions

Writing for Social Justice OR Life Studies

Known as one of Regis College's most transformative classes, these sections of Writing Analytically focus on social observation, analysis, and advocacy. 

Note: These sections (En/Route) require a year-long service learning component, for which students will receive an additional credit hour both semesters.

Fall Semester Course Options

RCC*200, Sections RU01 and RU02: Writing for Social Justice (3 semester hours)

In this section of Writing Analytically, we will focus on writing which practices being for and with others through social observation, analysis and advocacy. We will approach this theme in two ways: first, by means of weekly fieldwork at a Denver program or agency seeking to address basic human needs and to promote justice; and, second, by means of reading, reflection, discussion, and writing at Regis University. Our goal in taking a double approach is to trace the connections between academic life at Regis and life in and beyond the city of Denver. For more information on this section, visit enrouteregis.org

RCC*200 Section RU03: Life Stories (3 semester hours)

Telling stories is a way to make our experiences meaningful. Hearing other people’s stories is a way for us to understand who they are and what they care about. By sharing our stories, we can find the places in our lives where we connect with others and see our common humanity. In this seminar, through service and personal reflection, we will look at what goes into — and comes out of — the stories we make.

All three sections include enrollment in PC 231A: Service/Community-Based Learning (1 semester hour)

Spring Semester Course

PL 270C Introduction to Philosophy (3 semester hours)

Through the use of communication-intensive teaching methods, this introductory course in philosophy acquaints students with the range of questions and issues raised in both the philosophical tradition and contemporary thought and engages students in a critical analysis and evaluation of different philosophical positions, including their own.

Includes enrollment in PC 231A: Service/Community-Based Learning (1 semester hour)

The Matter of Life and Death

Fall Course: The Matter of Life and Death. RCC 200 RU04
This course will consider what it means to age in our society. Through course readings we will explore how our culture approaches the very difficult concept of aging and dying of old age. How has our approach changed in light of modern medicine? Is there a better approach? How is it different than other cultures? How do we deal with death and aging culturally? Despite such weighty matters the goal of this course is to peel some of the stigma surrounding aging away and think about how we can do what is best for our aging population.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Boeck, M.

Spring Course: Speaking to Make a Difference. COM 250C
This course develops engaged, competent, confident communicators, preparing speakers to connect with small and large, live and remote audiences. Encourages critical listening, writing, rehearsing, revising and speaking skills relevant to everyday, civic, professional and family/social life.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MWF, 11:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.
TBD

Select Topics for Writers

Fall Course: Select Topics for Writers. RCC 200 RU05
This course engages the contemporary issues of diversity, the environment, justice or persona; meaning as prompts for student writing. Students read, reasearch and write about these issues in the context of the question, "How ought we to live?"

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
TBD

Spring Course: Religion and the Human Quest. RT 201C
Considering human existence in relation to “the sacred” and drawing on Eastern and Western religious traditions, this course uses communication-intensive strategies to explore religious perspectives on human question about life, suffering, goodness, and ultimacy.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
TBD


Communication, Prison and Social Justice

Fall Course: Communication, Prison and Social Justice. RC 200 RU06

In an effort to understand the prison population expansion over the last forty years, this course examines the impact of the war on drugs, the schools-to-prison pipelines, the militarization of law enforcement, and the representation of crime and criminality in popular culture on the criminal justice system at-large.  One of the many problems this course hopes to address is the fact that 96% of these prisoners will be released back into our communities without having been offered many—and in some cases any—rehabilitative services. They will exit prison bitter, lonely, and unskilled; this explains in part why the formerly-incarcerated are so likely to commit further crimes. It is our charge to examine how these issues impact our communities.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Dawe, I.

Spring Course: Speaking to Make a Difference. COM 250C
This course develops engaged, competent, confident communicators, preparing speakers to connect with small and large, live and remote audiences. Encourages critical listening, writing, rehearsing, revising and speaking skills relevant to everyday, civic, professional and family/social life.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MWF, 10:30 a.m. - 11:20 p.m.
Dawe, I.


The Revolution and Evolution of Hip-Hop

Fall Course: The Revolution and Evolution of Hip-Hop. RCC 200 RU07

This course explores the evolution of the cultural revolution that is hip hop. We will specifically examine how and why hip hop burgeoned from an artistic movement in the South Bronx that provided a creative outlet and voice for those who were literally cut off from mainstream society, to a world-wide cultural revolution that continues to shape the future and direction of humanity.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Drwecki, B.

Spring Course: Religion and the Human Quest. RT 201C
Considering human existence in relation to “the sacred” and drawing on Eastern and Western religious traditions, this course uses communication-intensive strategies to explore religious perspectives on human question about life, suffering, goodness, and ultimacy.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
TBD

Cowboys, Madams and Outlaws

Fall Course: Cowboys Madams, and Outlaws. RCC 200 RU09

Our journey through the 19th century “Wild West” will begin with an examination of some of the mythical characters of the “Wild West,” in three Hollywood films: "Stagecoach," "High Noon," and "Tombstone."  We will then explore how each film reflects the period in which it was created and how each contrasts with actual historical sources.  Our end goal is to arrive at a more accurate understanding of this unique, complex region.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Gonzales, N.

Spring Course: History of the US Since 1865. HS 224C
This course develops engaged, competent, confident communicators, preparing speakers to connect with small and large, live and remote audiences. Encourages critical listening, writing, rehearsing, revising and speaking skills relevant to everyday, civic, professional and family/social life.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 9 - 10:15 a.m
Gonzales, N.


The Future of Energy

Fall Course: The Future of Energy. RCC 200 RU09

Our increasingly technology-dependent world requires a constant supply of fuel.  Worldwide demand for energy is projected to grow by almost forty percent over the next twenty years, even as production levels of oil, coal, and natural gas may approach their peaks and even begin to decline. To fill the resulting gap, a large-scale deployment of renewable and nuclear energy sources is almost inevitable. We will read about, discuss, and write about the scientific, technological, economic, and social consequences of these changes in the energy landscape.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Gray, F.

Spring Course: Speaking to Make a Difference. COM 250C
This course develops engaged, competent, confident communicators, preparing speakers to connect with small and large, live and remote audiences. Encourages critical listening, writing, rehearsing, revising and speaking skills relevant to everyday, civic, professional and family/social life.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MWF, 12:30 a.m. - 1:20 p.m.
TBD


Let Your Life Speak

Fall Course: Let Your Life Speak. RCC 200 RU10
What are your talents, interests, and passions? How do you feel called to serve the world around you? And how might Jesuit education contribute to your sense of calling? This seminar will explore the idea of “vocation” as a calling to use your talents and passions in service of others. We will also learn about distinctively Jesuit ways of discerning vocation within the context of core education at Regis.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Kloos, K.

Spring Course: Speaking to Make a Difference. COM 250C
This course develops engaged, competent, confident communicators, preparing speakers to connect with small and large, live and remote audiences. Encourages critical listening, writing, rehearsing, revising and speaking skills relevant to everyday, civic, professional and family/social life.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MWF, 1:30 a.m. - 2:20 p.m.
TBD


Superheroes

Fall Course: Superheroes. RCC 200 RU11

The oldest story in history stars a superhero named Gilgamesh. Today, three of the top five highest-grossing films of all time have featured heroes with special powers. Why do superheroes fascinate us? What can we learn by examining them through psychological, philosophical, and literary lenses? In this course, we will analyze superheroes from Achilles and Batman, to Xena and Zelda, as represented in literature, films, comics, and video games. Topics of discussion will include gender, social justice, and spirituality, as well as how heroes reflect and challenge their historical contexts.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Knorr, A.

Spring Course: Literature Matters. EN 250C
Introduces the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama. Students will write a series of analytical essays, including at least one research essay. This course emphasizes communication intensive strategies in course activities and assignments.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
TBD


Forks and Lives

Fall Course: Forks and Lives. RCC 200 RU 12

Kentucky farmer and author Wendell Berry has said, “Eating is an agricultural act.” This course will consider the many implications of our individual and collective food choices—the political, ethical, economic, and environmental results of what and how we feed ourselves. We will analyze cultural practices and contemporary controversies in the production and consumption of food, and we will reflect upon our own agricultural acts as expressions of how we ought to live.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
McGill, F.

Spring Course: Literature Matters. EN 250C
Introduces the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama. Students will write a series of analytical essays, including at least one research essay. This course emphasizes communication intensive strategies in course activities and assignments.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
TBD



Art Will Save Us

Fall Course: Art Will Save Us. RCC 200 RU13
The course title sounds sure, but the course will be more provisional, experimental, and analytical. By "art" do we mean painting, drawing, music, dance, sculpture, poetry, theatre? We will consider all of these arts--and more. By "us" do we mean you and your friends, your family, your town, your country? And what about "them"? And what would it mean to be "saved"? You don't have to be an artist to be in this course, but you should love the arts. Plan to attend some performances, visit museums, try out some sidewalk art, and attempt a bit of busking.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Palmer, D.

Spring Course: Religion and the Human Quest. RT 201C
This course develops engaged, competent, confident communicators, preparing speakers to connect with small and large, live and remote audiences. Encourages critical listening, writing, rehearsing, revising and speaking skills relevant to everyday, civic, professional and family/social life.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 9 - 10:15 a.m
TBD


Stories For Change

Fall Course: Stories For Change. RCC 200 RU14
From the small world of communicating heartfelt emotions to friends and family, to the larger world of national/international politics and culture, stories change us.  Stories can change a perspective, connect us to others, illustrate who we are and what we believe, make facts come alive, and motivate empathy and action. Together as new college writers we will dig deeper into social issues and discover what moves us as individuals and as a society.  We will practice the everyday, extraordinary art of writing to change the world. “The world changes according to the way people see it, and if you alter, even by a millimeter, the way…people look at reality, then you can change it.”  James Baldwin

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Passerini, E.

Spring Course: Speaking to Make a Difference. COM 250C
This course develops engaged, competent, confident communicators, preparing speakers to connect with small and large, live and remote audiences. Encourages critical listening, writing, rehearsing, revising and speaking skills relevant to everyday, civic, professional and family/social life.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MWF, 11:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.
TBD



Math, Science and the Liberal Arts

Fall Course: Math, Science and the Liberal Arts. RCC 200 RU15

NOTE: This section is not recommended for those majoring in Math or the Sciences because of the Spring Course Pairing.

Mathematics and the sciences have always been an integral part of a liberal arts education. But somewhere along the way, our culture began to view them as not only separate from, but even in conflict with the rest of the liberal arts. In this class, we'll think and write about this perceived divide, how we can begin to bridge it, and why it is important that we do so.  

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Patnott, M.

Spring Course: Introduction to Statistics. MT 270C
Presents standard topics in introductory statistics for students whose major is not mathematics. Topics include descriptive statistic, probability distributions, estimations, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation, and other topics. This course carries a communication focus in the course assignments.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MWF, 9 - 9:50 a.m.
Patnott, M

Nobel Peace Prize Laureates & the World

Fall Course: Nobel Peace Prize Laureates & the World. RCC 200 RU16

This course explores the lives and writings of some of the most important leaders of peace in recent history. The prestigious, and controversial, prize has been given to those who have "done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations . . .  and for the holding and promotion of peace," and we will examine the factors that enabled them to envision and then struggle for peace in their countries and the wider world. In the process we will learn about the historical contexts of these individuals as well as attempt to draw from their experiences in order to gain insights for our own lives and “how ought we to live.”

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Sanders, E.

Spring Course: Speaking to Make a Difference. COM 250C
This course develops engaged, competent, confident communicators, preparing speakers to connect with small and large, live and remote audiences. Encourages critical listening, writing, rehearsing, revising and speaking skills relevant to everyday, civic, professional and family/social life.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 9 - 10:15 a.m
Sanders, E.


The Wonder of "Yet"

Fall Course: The Wonder of "Yet". RCC 200 RU17
Research indicates that what we believe about our abilities greatly impacts our levels of academic, athletic, professional, and social achievement.  In this course, we will delve into research on the power of our beliefs, and we will explore our personal beliefs about our abilities.  We will discover how to become more effective learners, and discuss the importance of treating ourselves with kindness and respect in the process.  As the research of Carol Dweck suggests, perhaps we just cannot do something "yet".

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Springer, B.

Spring Course: American Musical Theater. FAC 254C
Offers a survey of the American Musical through general musical concepts while developing a working vocabulary of the elements of music. Utilizing communication-intensive techniques, this course examines the historical and social context of musical theater in the United States, from its earliest developments in the mid-nineteenth century to present day, and explores its major developments and influence in American culture.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Wright



Human and Civil Rights

Fall Course: Human and Civil Rights. RCC 200 RU18
Slavery, foot binding, child labor, women's suffrage, genocide, landmines, Apartheid, trafficking of women ... just a few of the world's concerns for human and civil rights.  How does an idea to end horrific landmines become a reality?  This course uses women’s literature from around the world to examine strategies that turn great ideas into global guarantees. Students will select a civil or human right of particular interest to them, and apply strategies for change.  An ideal course for pre-law students and anyone wishing to shape a better world!

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Wessner, D.

Spring Course: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. AN 204C
Introduces the methods and theory of cultural anthropology through a theoretical and comparative examination of the role of human life. Includes the study of cultural practices such as language, myth, gender, marriage, and sexuality, and economic and political practices in different cultures of the world. This course uses communication-intensive techniques in activities and assignments

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 9 - 10:15 a.m
Fokwang


Significant Moments in the History of Music

Fall Course: Significant Moments in the History of Music. RCC 200 RU19

We will investigate seminal moments throughout the history of music and explore how these musical texts served to make musical and cultural change. Different styles of music will be covered, including classical, jazz, folk, and rock and roll.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Wright, T.

Spring Course: Music of the Twentieth Century. FAC 255C
A survey of classical music in the western world in the twentieth century. Covers trends such as modality, atonality, serialism, neoclassicism, experimental music, and electronic and computer music and the social contexts surrounding these movements. This course carries a communication focus in the course assignments.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Notareschi

Education Reimagined, Possibilities Disclosed

Fall Course: Education Reimagined, Possibilities Disclosed. RCC 200 RU20

Note: This section is not recommended for athletes due to practice conflicts.

This course will engage in a discussion of the current realities and challenges present within the United States’ PK-12 education system. Through narratives, ethnographies, and case studies, we will examine a range of perspectives on what does (and doesn’t) work in our educational policies and practices. While this endeavor will entail a critical examination of the status quo, it also will invite students to recognize what is possible and inspiring in the work many courageous educators accomplish in the midst of challenging times.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
DeSisto, L.

Spring Course: Philosophical Explorations. PL 270C
Through the use of communication-intensive teaching methods, this introductory course in philosophy acquaints students with the range of questions and issues raised in both the philosophical tradition and contemporary thought and engages students in a critical analysis and evaluation of different philosophical positions, including their own.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
DeSisto, L.


Our Words, Women Writing Themselves

Fall Course: Our Words, Women Writing Themselves. RCC 200 RU21

Note: This section is not recommended for athletes due to practice conflicts.

This Writing Analytically course will explore women’s narratives in modern America. We will closely analyze literature, film, music and popular culture to examine the portrayal of female characters. What does it mean to be a woman in the 21st Century? How are women’s stories told? Who is doing the telling? We will examine these questions and discuss how women’s narratives are shaped in today’s changing society.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Peters, A.

Spring Course: Religion and the Human Quest. RT 201C
Considering human existence in relation to “the sacred” and drawing on Eastern and Western religious traditions, this course uses communication-intensive strategies to explore religious perspectives on human question about life, suffering, goodness, and ultimacy.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
TBD

Detectives: from Sherlock Holmes to Jessica Jones

Fall Course: Detectives: from Sherlock Holmes to Jessica Jones. RCC 200 RU22

Note: This section is not recommended for athletes due to practice conflicts.

This course follows detectives of page and screen as they bring to light the shadowy underbellies of reality and fiction. You will become a gumshoe and use analytical writing as your method to investigate cultural mysteries that interest you. Your observations, critical thinking, and logical reasoning skills will be crucial as you collect evidence and build case files of reading notes and academic research to see what hidden truths you can uncover.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Toth, C.

Spring Course: General Psychology. PY 250C
Introduces the science of behavior and mental processes through a systematic study of representative areas of psychology. This course  carries a communication focus in the course activities and assignments.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
Dwrecki


Select Topics for Writers

Fall Course: Select Topics for Writers. RCC 200 RU22

Note: This section is not recommended for those intending to major in accounting, business, economics or for athletes due to practice conflicts.

This course engages contemporary issues of diversity, the environment, justice, or personal meaning as prompts for student writing. Students read, research and write about these issues in the context of the question, "How ought we to live?"

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
TBA

Spring Course: Introduction to the American Economy. EC 200C
Through communication-intensive techniques, this course examines the history and development of the market economy and the effectiveness of relatively free markets in allocating society’s scarce resources to their best uses. Discusses other economic systems and the role of government in correcting shortcomings of the market system including externalities, cyclical instability, and income distribution.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MW, 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
Jacobson


Chinese Food Culture in America

Fall Course: Chinese Food Culture in America

Note: This section is not recommended for science/pre-health majors due to lab conflicts.

This course focuses on the role that Chinese cuisine has played in the development of society, culture, and identity in the United States over the past 150 years.  It examines the history of Chinese cuisine in China as well as foreign encounters with Chinese cuisine in China from the perspectives of both Europeans and Chinese-Americans.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
TR, 9:25 - 10:40 a.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Chiang, M.

Spring Course: Survey of Asian History Since 1850. HS 254C
Utilizing communication-intensive techniques, this course provides an overview of East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea) during modern times, emphasizing cultural developments, modern institutions, increased trade, industrialization, imperialistic intrusions, destructive warfare, and burgeoning population.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
TR, 9:25 - 10:40 a.m
Chiang, M.



International Communication and Human Rights

Fall Course: International Communication and Human Rights. RCC 200 RU25

Note: This section is not recommended for science/pre-health majors due to lab conflicts.

Human rights abuses such as human trafficking, forced labor, genocide, and the use of child soldiers are prevalent around the world. In this class we will explore how various human rights abuses occur as well as examine the role that traditional news media and communication technologies (such as social media and cell phones) play in both perpetuating and combating such abuses in different parts of the globe.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
TR, 9:25 - 10:40 a.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Sobel, M.

Spring Course: Religion and the Human Quest. RT 201C
Considering human existence in relation to “the sacred” and drawing on Eastern and Western religious traditions, this course uses communication-intensive strategies to explore religious perspectives on human question about life, suffering, goodness, and ultimacy.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
TR, 9:25 - 10:40 a.m.
Dwrecki


Read the World: Fiction, Film and Culture

Fall Course: Read the World: Fiction, Film and Culture. RCC 200 RU26

Note: This section is not recommended for science/pre-health majors due to lab conflicts.

How do our stories create the world, and how do they create what we become? How can the techniques of reading literature help us to read the world around us? From Mark Twain tales to Tarantino tragedies to trash TV, our fictions, films, and cultures define us in obvious ways and in ways we might not always understand. This course explores the flexible form of the essay as a way to understand your self and the world around you by seeing our selves and our stories in context.

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
TR, 1:45 - 3 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Dimovitz, S.

Spring Course: Literature Matters. EN 250C
Introduces the literary genres of poetry, fiction, and drama. Students will write a series of analytical essays, including at least one research essay. This course emphasizes communication intensive strategies in course activities and assignments.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
TR, 1:45 - 3 p.m.
TBA



Language Games

Fall Course: Language Games. RCC 200 RU27 

Note: This section is not recommended for science/pre-health majors due to lab conflicts.

Less than one percent of the total number of words in any language accounts for 60 percent of the language we use. And the smallest of these words tell the stories of our lives—who we believe ourselves to be, what we desire, what we fear. These words are an invisible script in which we write our identities. In this class, we will explore what our words say about us. What are the stories they tell? What do they reveal or conceal? In what way is language a game we play in order to make sense of our experience? How might we write new stories for ourselves by playing the game differently?

Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
TR, 1:45 - 3 p.m.
F, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Myklebust, N.

Spring Course: Introduction to Brain and Behaviour. NS 260C
Introduces the scientific study of how the brain relates to behavior. Explores how brain structure and function are involved in sensorimotor functions, motivation and emotion, cognition, and neurological disorders. This course  carries a communication focus in the course activities and assignments.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
TR, 12:15 - 1:30 p.m.
Fricks-Gleason


HONORS: The Idea of a University

Fall Course: The Idea of a University. RCC 200H RU01, RU02, and RU03

Note: Honors students only

Our seminar has three related goals.  First, by writing in and out of class, in a variety of forms, you will grow as a college writer.  Second, through historical and creative study of ways and places of knowing, we invite you to envision a place—your place—in the vast and ever-changing academy of knowledge known as the university.   Third, by treating that study as a practice of conversation and collaboration, we mean to promote a “community-of-learners” approach to academic inquiry that will enrich your experience in the Honors Program and throughout your Regis College career.

Section Number Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
RU01
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Howe, T.
RU02
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Kleier, C.
RU03
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Narcisi, L.

Honors Seminar: Tradition and Innovation
As the second course in a five-semester sequence, this course draws upon the intellectual tradition commonly called the humanities as it investigates the play between tradition and innovation in the human story.

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m
TBD

COMMITMENT: How Ought We to Live?

Fall Course: How Ought We to Live? RCC 200A RU01, RU02, RU03

In this course, we will seek to explore who we are and the worlds we inhabit. Our medium for exploration will be the essay, one of the most versatile forms of writing. Through reading and writing essays on topics ranging from identity and immigration, to love and language, to science and sports, to pop culture and haute couture, we will discover and define what it means to live in America today and begin to answer the essential question of the Regis mission, How ought we to live?

Section Number Fall Schedule Fall Instructor
RU01
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Kolanowski, C.
RU02
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
Ennis, M.
RU03
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m.
TBD

Spring Course: How Ought We to Live? RCC 200B
A continuation of RCC 200A, this course provides instruction in writing proficiency and research methods, with more emphasis on critical reading and engaging sources. As we explore who we are and the worlds we inhabit, we will continue to discover and define what it means to live in America today and seek answers to the essential question of the Regis mission, How ought we to live?

Spring Schedule Spring Instructor
MWF, 9 - 10:15 a.m
TBD