• Abigail Gosselin

    Associate Professor and Department Chair

    Social and Political Philosophy; Feminist Philosophy; Global Justice; Philosophy of Psychiatry

    Regis College

    303.458.4971
    agosseli@regis.edu

Professional Bio

Dr. Gosselin’s scholarly interests include questions around mental illness and addiction, the effects of service learning on vocational discernment and the promotion of justice, and responsibility for social issues such as global poverty. She is currently writing on agency and the effects of stigma in mental illness.

Doctorate of Philosophy in Philosophy, University of Colorado at Boulder, August 2005
Graduate Teacher Program Certificate, University of Colorado at Boulder, April 2004
Master of Arts in Philosophy, University of Colorado at Boulder, May 2002
Women’s Studies Graduate Certificate, University of Colorado at Boulder, May 2002
Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy and Humanities, University of New Hampshire, May 1999

Research & Scholarship

Book

Gosselin, Abigail, Global Poverty and Individual Responsibility, Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2009.

Selected Articles

Gosselin, Abigail, “Global Gender Injustice and Mental Disorders,” in Global Gender Justice, Ed. Alison M. Jaggar, Polity Press, 2014, 100-114.

Adkins, Karen and Abigail Gosselin, “Learning from the Labs: Reimagining Ethics Instruction,” Expositions: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities 7:1 (2013), 22-32.

Gosselin, Abigail, “The Epistemic Function of Narratives and the Globalization of Mental Disorders,” International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6:1 (Spring 2013), 46-67.

Gosselin, Abigail, “Addiction Narratives: Background Assumptions and Policy Implications,” Social Philosophy Today, 28 (2012), 47-66.

Gosselin, Abigail, “Cultivating Discernment,” Jesuit Higher Education: A Journal, 1:1 (2012), 16-30.

Gosselin, Abigail, “Memoirs as Mirrors: Counterstories in Contemporary Memoir,” Narrative 19:1 (January 2011), 133-148.

Gosselin, Abigail, “Global Poverty and Responsibility: Identifying the Duty-Bearers of Human Rights,” Human Rights Review 8:1 (October-December 2006), 35-52.

Book Reviews

Gosselin, Abigail, “Review of Peter Singer’s book The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism is Changing Ideas About Living Ethically (Yale University Press, 2015),” Teaching Philosophy, 39:2 (June 2016), 235-238.

Selected Presentations

“Cultivating Ethical Dispositions through Service Learning,” (a workshop presented with Jason Taylor), Thirty-second International Social Philosophy Conference (a meeting of the North American Association for Social Philosophy), University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, July 23, 2016

“A Pragmatist Interpretation of Schizophrenia,” Society for the Philosophy of Science in Practice, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ, June 17, 2016

“Teaching Justice through Service Learning” (a panel presentation with Karen Adkins and Jason Taylor), Thirty-first International Social Philosophy Conference (a meeting of the North American Association for Social Philosophy), William Jewell College, Liberty, Missouri, July 16, 2015

“From Dementia Praecox to Split Personality to Paranoid Schizophrenia: Injustice and the Contingency of Schizophrenia,” Thirtieth International Social Philosophy Conference (a meeting of the North American Association for Social Philosophy), Southern Oregon University, Ashland, Oregon, July 17, 2014

 “Hermeneutical Injustice and the ‘Language’ of Mental Disorders,” Association for Feminist Ethics and Social Theory 2013 conference, Tempe, Arizona, October 17-20, 2013

Community Involvment & Service

Service for Regis College (selected)

Department Chair, Department of Philosophy (Fall 2016-present)

Member of Committee on Rank and Tenure (Fall 2014-present); Chair (Fall 2016-Spring 2017)

Meaning Coordinator for Integrative Core (Fall 2013-present)

Member of Faculty Handbook Committee (Fall 2009-Spring 2016; Chair for 4 years; led major revision to the Handbook, 2015-2016)

Also involved with Jesuit mission/education activities, teaching in the En/Route program, and mental health outreach on campus