Put Away Your Wallet

Aren’t there enough forces in the universe conspiring to throw a wrench in your day? It seems that between stubbed toes and the neighbor’s incessant car alarm, this category is already pretty well covered. Why, then, do so many universities make students jump through hoops to accept their transfer credits?

Regis University answers this question the only way we know how—with one of the most generous transfer credit policies in higher education. Life is already tough—we’re here to help make your day a little bit easier.

Let’s talk details. Here’s what Regis’ transfer policy can offer you:

You may transfer up to 87 undergraduate credit hours* from regionally accredited institutions
Your credits will never expire—if they’re on a transcript, we recognize them
If transferring fewer than 45 credit hours, and starting a program in business, computing, education, liberal arts or social sciences, you’ll begin at Regis with Cornerstone, part of Regis's adult learner core curriculum
Our Associate’s to Bachelor’s Program will allow you to complete your degree in only one to two years
Apply today using our no-fee application

Generous? We’d like to think so. But more importantly, we see it as recognition for the efforts you’ve made. You’ve worked hard for your credits and learned a lot in the process. We’d prefer you spend your time studying the things that matter to you—not repeating core classes over and over again. 

Regis University simply wants to help you complete your education and reach your goals. Our generous transfer policies, scholarships and low fees complement our flexible schedules and online study to offer you private school benefits at tuition rates you expect to find only at a state school.

First though, you must act on your own behalf. Speak with one of our admissions counselors or fill out our no-fee application today.

As a cherry on the top of our generous transfer policies, you can earn up to $500 through #RegisInspired scholarships.

*Transfer credits and tuition vary by program, and length of program is influenced by the amount of course work taken each term.