Many students choose Regis because of our numerous opportunities to engage and give back to larger Denver community. Father Woody’s Service Programs, named for Denver’s patron of the poor, Charles B. Woodrich, has been provided generations of Regis students with the opportunity to honor Father Woody’s lifelong mission of serving the poor, homeless and forgotten.

After high school, twin sisters Tina and Melissa La were searching for new ways to use their gifts and talents to contribute and engage with their community, and they found a natural fit at Father Woody’s.

Named for Denver’s patron of the poor, Charles B. Woodrich, Father Woody’s has provided generations of Regis students with the opportunity to honor its lifelong mission of serving the poor, homeless and forgotten.

For Tina, Father Woody’s allowed her to combine her passion for creativity with giving back.

“I wanted to get back into crocheting and making things like hats and blankets,” she said. “As a volunteer with Father Woody’s, I started crocheting again and making hats for needy children and babies, and decorations for the Mullen House for the Elderly”

Both sisters have seen the need among the most vulnerable populations and how they can play a role in creating a more just society. Part of making a difference means meeting people where they are. The sisters agree that the program emphasizes, that no matter what circumstances an individual finds, there is always something to be thankful for.

“Although some of the individuals we work with may not have a lot, they are able to live happily,” Melissa said. “This is important because in life, many people take things for granted and don’t understand how fortunate they are.”

Through the Father Woody’s program, the sisters have participated in activities like making dinner and forming relationships with the elderly, helping low-income children, looming hats and blankets for the homeless and wrapping thousands of gifts for the Father Woody’s Christmas Party.

In addition to deepening their understanding of the voices of the marginalized, they have also developed the tools needed to challenge and change the structure of our society in the future.

“I’ve learned leadership skills and how to be a good role model for others,” Tina said. “Through this program, I’ve become more outspoken and engaged with those around me.”

It is by serving others and developing relationships within the community that Father Woody’s Service Programs encourages students, like Tina and Melissa, to pursue justice on behalf of all persons now and after graduation.   

For more information and how to get involved with Father Woody’s Service Programs, click here